Bhutan Journals

In and Around Paro, Bhutan

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An October 2008 trip to Bhutan by koshkha

Rinchen Ling Lodge/Rinchenling Lodge Photo, Bhutan, Asia More Photos
Quote: The first stage or our tour of Bhutan, this journal focuses on the second biggest city called Paro, and its attractions. Two Brits, two bears, one guide, two drivers and lots of sunshine and mountains. The trip was coordinated by a UK and Bhutan-based company called Blue Poppy.

Paro Airport - Famously Scary

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The airport terminal Photo, Bhutan, Asia
Quote:
Paro Airport is the only airport in the small Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan and is renowned as one of the world's most scary airports for landings. Only eight pilots worldwide are qualified to land at Paro but I'm really pleased that I didn't know that before I went there. It's a condition of getting your visa to visit Bhutan that all travellers - with the exception of those from India - have to either enter or leave the country by air. Most will probably do both as the road journey to the border is so awful and so time consuming that it really can't be recommended.We flew to Paro in mid-October on a clear, warm, sunny day so our experience really wasn't very worrying at all. However, the ai...Read More
Windows Photo, Bhutan, Asia
Quote:
Walking around the Bhutanese town of Paro, it's easy to be confused. Firstly it seems hard to believe that this rather tiny place is actually the second biggest town or city in the country and secondly, you can get confused about which century you've found yourself living in. The first impression I had was one of wandering through an almost medieval town where all the buildings looked SO old yet so well preserved. Then I started to wonder at how tidy and well laid out it seemed to be. Surely something so seemingly old would have degenerated into a rather more chaotic place by now? The mystery was soon solved; despite looking like it's been there since time immemorial, most of current-day Paro town dat...Read More
Bhutanese archer Photo, Bhutan, Asia
Quote:
The ancient art of "bows-and-arrows" is the National Sport of Bhutan and is the most common way for young men-folk to pass a Sunday afternoon. I did wonder if archery had grown from a history of hunting small furry critters for food but I was wrong. Archery is not about food, it's about war - shooting at invading Tibetan armies or fighting with your neighbours. In a country with mountainous terrain many of the usual forms or warfare have limited use and so archery remained an effective form of warfare long after the rest of the world had moved on to guns and missiles.On any Sunday afternoon when any self-respecting young man in Europe or North America would be out playing soccer with his f...Read More

Rinchen Ling Lodge/Rinchenling Lodge

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Hotel | "A Country Lodge near Bhutan's Second City"

Rinchen Ling Lodge/Rinchenling Lodge Photo, Bhutan, Asia
Quote:
The Rinchen Ling Lodge was the first of three hotels we used during our trip to Bhutan and was both the most basic and the most friendly of the three. The Lodge is about 4 or 5 km outside Paro town and at first I was a bit disappointed that we wouldn't be staying more centrally. There wasn't anything around the hotel and it was a bit isolated but the setting was beautiful, nestled amongst fields in the shadow of tree-covered mountains.The hotel sits between Paro and some of the key attractions including the abandoned Drukgyel Dzong, the temple of Kyichu and the famous Tiger's Nest.On arrival our bags were taken to our room by a couple of the staff. We were staying i...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on January 18, 2009

Rinchen Ling Lodge/Rinchenling Lodge
Shaba
Paro, Bhutan

National Museum of Bhutan

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Attraction | "A Little Bit of Everything from Bhutan"

National Museum of Bhutan  Photo, Bhutan, Asia
Quote:
Bhutan's National Museum is located not in the capital city of Thimphu, but in the second city of Paro. It's housed in a round building which started life as the watchtower for Paro Dzong, the fortress-monastery that sits below it on the hillside on the outskirts of Paro. It was built in 1641 and converted into the National Museum in 1968. Normally the museum would be visited on the same day as the Dzong, but our first day in town was a Monday and the museum is closed that day. Consequently our visit was taken after climbing to see the Tiger's Nest monastery and before leaving for Thimphu.Sitting in the car on the way to the museum I was feeling a bit nervous. My legs were aching from the ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on January 18, 2009

National Museum of Bhutan
Behind the Paro Dzong
Paro District, Bhutan
+975 (8) 271257