Ireland Journals

Ireland's Wild Natural Beauty

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An August 2004 trip to Ireland by Sierra

Giants Causeway Photo, County Antrim, Northern Ireland More Photos
Quote: There is a lot to see in Ireland, but some of the best is what comes naturally to this country: its amazing landscapes and beautiful views.

Ireland's Wild Natural Beauty

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Overview

Portsrush, sunset Photo, Ireland, Europe
Quote:
O Ireland isn't it grand you look-- Like a bride in her rich adornin? John Locke "The Exile's Return" Ireland is called 'The Emerald Isle', and with good reason--blessed with the mild Gulf stream, its temperatures rarely stray beyond its 35-70°F range. In fact, Ireland's temperate clime is mild enough that you can find bamboo and palm trees in the southwestern parts of the country. I remember my first flight over Ireland, when I was 14 and we were headed for Europe. The country appeared far beneath us, bright green in the morning sunshine, almost artificial-looking, probably seeming twice as colorful after the monochrome dreariness of the semi-frozen North...Read More

Giant's Causeway

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Attraction

Giant's Causeway Photo, County Antrim, Northern Ireland
Quote:
Close to the village of Bushmill in Northern Ireland (home of the world's oldest legal distillery, opened in 1608) lies an ancient geographical wonder known today as Giant's Causeway. It is the top visitor attraction in Ireland, as well as the only World Heritage site in Ireland, so of course we had it upon our list of must-see's! The legends state that the national folklore hero, Finn McCool - giant and Ulster warrior - built this causeway for one of two reasons. Either it was to bring his lady love across the sea from Staffa, or it was to resolve a conflict with a rival giant on Staffa. Either way, it is a charming story and a bit more colorful than the geological explanation. The ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 29, 2004

Giant's Causeway
The Causeway Coast
County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

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Attraction

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge Photo, County Antrim, Northern Ireland
Quote:
On the north end of Ireland, not too far eastward from Giant's Causeway along Larrybane headland, is a much-beloved tourist site known as the Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge. This slender strand, suspended at least 80-feet above the tidewaters below, is the latest reincarnation of a bridge that has been used by local fishermen for some 400 years. The name of the bridge, "Carrick-a-Rede" ("Carraig-a-Rade") means "rock in the road," with the road in question being the route that the salmon migrate along the north coast. The seas here are quite rough at times, often too rough for small craft, so the bridge allows fishermen to cross to the smaller island, which sits firmly in the midst of ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 4, 2004

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge
Ballintoy, County Antrim
County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Cliffs of Moher

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Attraction | "The Cliffs of Moher"

Cliffs of Moher Photo, County Clare, Ireland
Quote:
In one of my all-time favorite films, The Princess Bride, the title princess has been kidnapped and is being brought over a rough obstacle course of an escape route. One of the obstacles they surmount is the Cliffs of Insanity, which the hero climbs up after his beloved. Now, The Princess Bride was filmed in many beautiful locations, and even these dark and forboding cliffs (which are supposed to be thousands of feet high) are quite lovely. And, they were filmed at a real location - the Cliffs of Moher in Ireland. The Cliffs of Moher stretch for roughly 8km between Liscannor and Doolin on the west coast of Ireland, an easy drive from Galway, and a short distance from one of Irelan...Read More

Cliffs of Moher
Southwestern Edge of the Burren Region
County Clare, Ireland

The Ring of Kerry

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Story/Tip

Central Glenbeigh, Kerry Penninsula Photo, Ireland, Europe
Quote:
On the southwest corner of Ireland lies four peninsulas, all beautiful in their own right, but the largest of these and often regarded as the loveliest among them is the Kerry Peninsula. The road that takes you around this peninsula is called The Ring of Kerry and is regarded as a "must-see" among Irish sights. Most visitors tend to base their trips in this area from the town of Killarney, a fairly sizeable town located just east of the peninsula, and which has several tourist attractions in its own right. However, we passed up Killarney - with its inevitably inflated-for-the-tourists hotel prices - and found lodgings at the lovely ...Read More