Sanford Stories and Tips

House in the Horseshoe Pt. 2

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member

In 1954 the Moore County Historical Association purchased and restored the home. In 1957 it was opened to the public. In 1972 the Association allowed their lease to expire hereby giving the state the home. The home is now under the protection and designation of the Historic Sites Program.

In addition to the marvelous house there are several other structures on the property. The 1803 cotton barn now serves as a small museum and highlights the home and the area. There is a log structure that was used for storing corn. Though not an original part of the structure (it was taken from a farm in Randolph county) it is correct to the time period and there would have most likely been such a structure on the property. There is also a reconstructed 19th century building called the "commissary’ that was used to house food for the farm hands. There is also garden which is similar to what the family would have had at the time.

There is a visitor center when you first pull in. It is on the right hand side right before you get to the parking area. They have an assortment of local crafts, post cards, and books. You can also get your passport stamped here. They do have a rest room though for special events you do get lucky and get to use the port-a-potty. It is handicapped accessible. The house its self has limited accessibility. There is a handicapped ramp at the house allowing guest to enter the house and enjoy the first floor. Again like many other historic structures, due to the age of the house, the second floor is not handicapped accessible.

Tours of the house are offered every half hour during operating hours. During some events the house will be open but tours are not offered. They will have costumed docents placed in each room who will be glad to answer any questions about the house you may have. Unless otherwise stated, the house will be open to the public at some point during events. The house was recently featured on the PBS show NC Weekend .

Hours/admissions:

From April to October: Tuesday through Saturday from 9am to 5pm, Sunday from 1pm to 5pm.

From November to March: Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 4pm, Sunday from 1pm to 4pm.

Closed major holidays.

Admission is free though there are charges for special events and they vary. Donations greatly accepted and highly encouraged by me..vampirefan. These places run mainly on contributions by generous individual such as yourself.

Special events

Special events include a militia muster in the spring and a Christmas open house in December. But the biggest event is the battle reenactment held the first full weekend in August. Hundreds of reactors and battle enthusiast’s coverage on this historic site for a weekend of fun and education. Great for the whole family. Check the website for more information on the events and times. Hours may vary for events.

Recommended reading

North Carolina’s State Historic Sites by Gary L. McCullough and Marvelous Old Mansions and other Southern Treasures by Sylvia Higginbotham Available from Blair Publishers, www.blairpub.com.

Website: www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us. Then click on the sites section then the House in the Horseshoe.

The nearest towns are Sanford and Carthage where you will find plenty to fill you up after a day of running around the house. During major events there are food vendors on the premises. If you happen to come up Highway 73 you are in for a real treat. You will pass through the pottery highway. This area is well known for its pottery and you will find pottery shops all along the highway.

This house is truly a pleasure to visit. I always marvel at the steadfastness of homes that have managed to survive for almost 250 years. And today this house is still as awe inspiring as when Philip and his family first stepped foot inside. It is a true place for anyone who loves history. Like many of the historic places, the house sits a bit off a major road. As you ride along the back roads you will enjoy the scenery of green pasturelands that hugs ever inch of the bend. I hope if you ever find you’re self this way that you will stop and visit this grand lady.

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