A Novel Approach to Savannah

John Berendt's Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil has been on the NY Times Best Sellers' List FOREVER. I wanted to see what it would be like to use it as a "guide book" for a visit to one of the South's most famous cities.


A Novel Approach to Savannah

Member Rating 0 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

I went to high school in the heart of Georgia's Coastal Empire so close to Savannah that my prom date took me to dinner at the Chart House Restaurant on River Street. I went to a university so near Savannah that weekly bar-hopping excursions were not uncommon for me and my friends. I was often found on the smoke-hazy dance floor of Malone's in the City Market dancing my heart out. Almost a decade later, however, I took the time to see some of the things that really make Savannah interesting---her marvelous history---and I used a best selling novel as my tour guide. ${QuickSuggestions} Savannah is a beautiful and magical place to visit. However, the crime rate is high in certain sections. While the residents have reclaimed much of the Historic District for themselves and tourists, city smarts are very much in order here. It's easy to be lulled by the peaceful visage of the many city squares at night, but do not walk through them in the evenings. Though Savannah can feel like a small town, this is an illusion. Avoid driving or walking in areas that you are not familiar with as certain parts of the city are notorious for gang and drug activity. With that said, Savannah is always lovely, and you should have a lot of fun without any incidents. Simply use some common sense.${BestWay} Savannah is a wonderful city in which to walk. Parking is actually a pain in the butt most days, and hotels will charge for parking garages. The sidewalks are full of meters that MUST be fed as cars DO get towed (not on weekends). Pay attention to street cleaning times (even on weekends) as the city takes this activity seriously. Cabs are good to take at night if you don't know where you are going (and they are safer than walking) though you will often have to call them from your restaurant or hotel. A car is necessary if you are going anywhere outside of the historic district such as to the Oglethorpe or Savannah malls on the other side of the city.

Hamilton Turner Inn

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

The Hamilton-Turner Home is part of the 'Midnight Book Tour' because it was once owned by one of the characters in the book. At one point it was also the only house of its type in the Historic District opened for tours. It has since been turned into a lovely Inn. We went inside and met Charlie Strickland, the owner, who graciously showed us one of the beautifully decorated rooms. It was large and comfortable with Victorian furniture, and I could easily see myself staying there. There is an added bonus in that there is an old Savannah rumor that says the Hamilton Turner House is haunted. In a way, I think that might add to the charm. After all, I'm sure a Southern ghost would be a perfect lady or gentleman! By the way, room rates vary according to which size room you get. Rooms start at $180 and move up to $350. There is a discount in the off-season (hot summer months), but be prepared to make reservations ahead of time the rest of the year!
Hamilton Turner Inn
330 Abercorn Street
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 233-1833

Magnolia Place

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

I did not stay at the Magnolia Grand Inn during my last visit to Savannah, but it was such a beautiful building with ivy climbing up the front steps that I felt compelled to go inside. Jane Sales, the Innkeeper, was very kind and gave my friend and I a small tour of the home. The front door to the Magnolia is actually kept locked at all times for the comfort and safety of guests (a common practice with B&B's in Savannah), but there is a reception building to one side in which I found Jane to help us. Built in 1878, the Magnolia Place Inn has wonderfully spacious rooms and a very elegant staircase winding up to its second floor. The home also has a wonderful history. Jane told us that Conrad Aiken, a Pulitzer Prize winning poet, was actually born in one of the rooms. As Conrad Aiken's childhood house was already on our 'Midnight Book Tour' of sites to see, the fact that we had stopped at Magnolia Place fit in nicely. John Berendt, the author of 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,' has also frequented the Magnolia on his visits to Savannah. The room rates vary according to the size of the room chosen and the season and can be anywhere from $145-$270. The Inn is directly across the street from Forsyth Park. It is next door to the Georgia Historical Society. I would love to stay there at a future date.
Magnolia Place
530 Whitaker Street
Savannah, Georgia
(912) 236-7674

Clary's Cafe

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

Clary's Cafe has been a Savannah fixture since 1903. It is family owned and operated, and it is the place that John Berendt (author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil) first met one of the more interesting characters, Luther Driggers, that he described in his famous book. It is part of the 'Midnight Book Tour,' so we stopped in for lunch. It was a blazing hot July day, and the lemonade could not be beaten! There were photos of Clint Eastwood hanging on the walls in addition to a painted mural of Savannah and a stained-glass window showing the cover picture of 'Midnight'. All the waitstaff had t-shirts with 'Midnight' logos on them as well. Still, the place had a strange 50's quality. There are a few too many flies humming in the air, but the pimento cheese sandwiches and black bean soup we ordered were cheap and yummy. The waiter was absolutely delightful, calling us 'sweetie' with a Southern lilt that made it impossible to be offended by him. When he put our bill on our table and noticed me swatting an especially fat fly away, he innocently asked if we were happy with our visit. I said 'yes' and he charmingly answered, 'because sometimes people will wait to get to the counter before telling us like it is.' My friend and I burst out laughing. If you go to Clary's know that it is not fine dining. It is also not intended to be. While it has certainly capitalized upon its Hollywood fame as much as it possibly can, many locals still grab a bite to eat at this restaurant, and we were glad we had given it a look.
Clary's Cafe
404 Abercorn St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 233-0402

Shrimp Docks

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by barbara on April 10, 2005

The city of Richmond Hill has become a thriving bedroom community of sorts for Savannah, which is located 20 minutes to the east, and for Fort Stewart, which is located 20 minutes to the west. Real estate here has gone up tremendously in value over the last 20 years, as land can still be had on the water. There are homes in every price range up to the multimillions. Actor Ben Affleck actually owns property in this vicinity, but as we approached Shrimp Docks, we did not know what to expect from the restaurant. We drove through a cluster of trailers into the parking lot. Then we climbed the stairs up to the front door.

Perched high like a beach house on stilts, Shrimp Docks boasts a fabulous view once you get inside. While the sand gnats were out in force in the early spring, making the dock unappealing, we sat at a table in front of the wide windows looking over a waterway that reminded me of the salt-water marshes in Charleston. I could just imagine walking down the dock and throwing a crab pot over the side! With a mural of water on the opposite wall above a row of booths, pale wood tables and chairs, and area paintings and photographs by local artists, the decor was nice but not overdone or stuffy. White spindle starfish hang above the window glass. I was very comfortable in a skirt, but I noticed a few other patrons were wearing shorts, as temperatures were already pushing into the 80’s outside.

So how was the food? Here was the thing that would really make this a place worth visiting. The guy who runs it was trained as a chef in Atlanta. As a proprietor of another restaurant in nearby Midway, he really knows how to prepare seafood! Starting off with a cup of crab stew chockfull of crab meat, I decided to order the crab cakes ($17) for an entrée. Not too bready at all, these were delicious and served in a nice portion. I also enjoyed the asparagus and mashed potatoes that came with this meal, though I eyed the cheese grits my mother ordered as her side. The other adults at the table got seafood platters ($23), which can be served fried, blackened, or broiled. These generous helpings of fish, scallops, and shrimp were too much to eat all at once, and we actually took some home. A nice bottle of pinot noir complimented the meal. My son was happy with a simple order of chicken fingers ($7 from the appetizer menu).

Bottom line? If you're in Richmond Hill on the outskirts of Savannah and want a nice restaurant, Shrimp Docks will hit the spot. The service was excellent, the atmosphere was lovely, and we greatly enjoyed our meal.

Shrimp Docks
2943 Kilkenny Road
Savannah, Georgia, 31324
(912) 727-5999

Midnight in Garden of Good and Evil Book Tour

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

Reading a book like 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil' gave me a new way of looking at a city I had visited many times before. Using the book as a loose tour guide pushed me to see some great things of historical significance in the city that I didn't even know were there! In the end it was fun to see the places spoken about in a good book---a book that kept me up late for three nights in a row before I could put it down---but it was more wonderful to just walk through the beautiful squares and read the historical plaques sprinkled throughout Savannah's historical district. The whole experience made for a very nice day.
Garden of Good and Evil Book Tour

Savannah, Georgia, 31401

Mercer House

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

The Mercer House is a beautiful private residence that was the setting for Danny Hansford's murder in the early 80's. While Danny Hansford is not famous, the book that was consequently written about the murder trials after his death has made Mercer House one of the most photographed buildings in the Savannah area. It is currently up for sale for $9,000,000 at the time of this journal writing (7-2000). Though we could not go within the wrought-iron fence, it was easy to see that it is HUGE and beautiful. The Carriage House which is located at 430 Whitaker Street (it is the Mercer House's carriage house) is worth a drop-in as well. It used to be the Williams' Antique Shop spoken about in 'Midnight' but now has books, cards, prints and basic (but tasteful) Savannah souveniers available for purchase. I liked the black cat the proprietor lets lounge on the hardwood floors while patrons go about their shopping. It was a nice reprieve from the Georgia heat.
Mercer House
429 Bull Street, Monterey Square
Savannah, Georgia, 31401

The Armstrong House

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

The Armstrong House was interesting to walk by as it looks unlike any of the other buildings we viewed. At one time it was Armstrong Junior College, founded in the early 1930's to be "the finest and most costly junior college in the South." Armstrong University is now located on the other side of Savannah having outgrown the Armstrong House some time ago. The Armstrong House is on "The Book Tour" as it once housed the antiques of Jim Williams, the man who has four murder trials profiled in the Midnight book. Across the street is the exclusive (and very private) Oglethorpe Club which is also on "The Book Tour." That building was once used by Northern officers as a headquarters during the American Civil War.
Armstrong House
447 Bull Street
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 232-7193

Forsyth Park

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

John Berendt wrote much of his famous 'Midnight' book in the Forsyth Parkside Apartments on Gwinnett and Whitaker Streets, but I found Forsyth Park itself much more interesting than the writer's old residence. There is a beautiful fountain to one side, great trees strewn with Spanish Moss, and a tall monument to a Civil War General. There were many people on benches reading and enjoying the shade though I also, unfortunately, noticed a homeless man sleeping. There are walking and running paths cut through the 20 acre park and a large open field where people were throwing around a football. If I had brought my running shoes, I would definitely have made part of my route go through Forsyth. I did see several people running and walking their dogs. Mr. Berendt often ran through the park in the early morning hours, and he wrote about some of the people he would continually see also exercising until his curiosity was sparked, making him want to know more about them.
Forsyth Park
Historic District
Savannah, Georgia, 31401

Conrad Aiken's Homes

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

Conrad Aiken was a very famous Southern writer who won a Pulitzer Prize for his poetry. While he spent much of his life in New England, Savannah claims him as a native son. About Savannah Conrad wrote, 'Born in that most magical of cities, Savannah, I was allowed to run wild in that earthly paradise until I was nine, ideal for the boy who early decided he wanted to write.' If you are familiar with his work, you will want to walk by his childhood home. Of course, John Berendt makes reference to Conrad in 'Midnight', but I was also happy that going to view his house took us directly across the street from the Colonial Park Cemetary. While having nothing to do with the novel that served as a catalyst for this Savannah excursion, the cemetary proved very interesting to walk through, too (See journal entry on Colonial Cemetary for more information). Conrad Aiken is actually buried in the Bonaventure Cemetary, so don't look for him in the Colonial.
Conrad Aiken's Homes
228 and 230 E. Oglethorpe Ave.
Savannah, Georgia, 31401

Flannery O'Connor's Childhood Home

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

While on our 'Midnight Book Tour' I was thrilled to stumble upon Flannery O'Connor's Childhood Home. I knew that Flannery was from Savannah, but I had never bothered to see if there were any memorials maintained there for her before. As Flannery only spent her very early years in LaFayette Square (to age 13) before moving to Milledgeville, Georgia after her father died of Lupus (the disease that would later claim her as well), the house museum is fairly bare. Admission was only $2, however, and I feel strongly that Flannery O'Connor was the greatest American short story writer of the 20th century. It was interesting to see the place of her humble beginnings.
There was a lady within the home who gave some basic information about Flannery, but I thought that she must've been a volunteer because she did not know answers to many specific questions about O'Connor's work. Still, she had met Flannery when Flannery was a little girl in Savannah---calling her Mary Flannery back then---and gave a basic overview of the writer's life. There was a small garden in back of the house where Flannery apparently had played with her dollhouse. Her room and her parents' room upstairs were in the process of being restored, though we were allowed to peek in on them. The house has very limited operating hours---Saturdays and Sundays 1-4 PM---but special arrangements can be made to view the house at other times if O'Connor's work really interests you. The home also serves as a literary center with readings during the high season. Call 912-233-6014 for more information. If no one answers, leave a message, and someone will get back with you.
Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home
207 East Charlton St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
+1 912 233 6014

Andrew Low Home

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

We walked by the Andrew Low house after leaving Flannery O'Connor's home. It is on the same square and directly across the street from the Hamilton-Turner House (now an Inn) that was on our 'Midnight Book Tour'. It was very interesting to sit in the large courtyard and contrast the different size of this house to the O'Connor home that we had just left behind. Andrew Low was a very prominent cotton merchant in the 1800's, and I understand the interior of the home is filled with period antiques. The Julliette Gordon Low birthplace on 142 Bull Street is a must-see in conjunction with the Andrew Low Home if Scouting is of interest to you. Ms. Low was the famous founder of the Girl Scouts. There is an admission fee to the Andrew Low Home.
Andrew Low House
329 Abercorn St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
+1 912 233 6854

City Market

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

As you walk around the historic district, you will pass an antiques store on what seems like every corner. If that's your thing, they are certainly worth looking inside. The City Market is a collection of stores full of art, antiques, etc... that is a good place to go as well. The City Market is on the 'Midnight Book Tour' because Joe Odom, a main character in the book, had opened a piano jazz bar called Sweet Georgia Brown's in that vicinity on W. St. Julian Street.
Thomas Kinkade City Market Gallery
Jefferson Street at West St. Julian Street
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
+1 912 447 4660

River Street

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

Any Savannah tour would be remiss if it did not include at least a short walk down River Street. Home to over sixty restaurants, shops and other businesses, River Street is a very popular tourist destination. It can actually get a bit crowded and crazy in the evenings, but I would advise a stroll next to the river anyway. There are several nice restaurants to choose from. Souvenirs are easily acquired from any number of shops. The bridge spanning the river makes for a beautiful skyline, and the orignal cobblestones on the street add a lot of charm. The Hyatt on River Street is a good luxury hotel in which to spend a weekend if you are looking for accomodations in the area. St. Patrick's Day down by the River is a crazy time of year, but one that many choose to spend on River Street. The Savannah St. Patrick's Day Celebration is one of the largest in the country. Thousands of people flock to Savannah in droves to celebrate the Irish holiday with free-flowing beer and good humor in the Historic District. Even the Fountains flow green for the occassion. If you plan to be in the city to see the parade and join in on the merry-making, make accomodations reservations WELL in advance. I actually prefer tamer times of the year, but St. Patrick's Day in Savannah is an interesting experience. Regardless of when you visit Savannah, make sure you go to River Street for a visit.
Savannah Riverfront/River Street
Savannah's Historic Waterfront
Savannah, Georgia, 31401

Bonaventure Cemetery

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

The now famous statue featured on the front cover of 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil' no longer resides in Bonaventure Cemetery but at the Telfair Museum of Art. However, Bonaventure is still a beautiful cemetery to visit with its moss-shrouded trees and gray memorials to Savannah citizens long passed on. Conrad Aiken is buried there along with songwriter Johnny Mercer. The cemetery is open from 8-5 daily for anyone wanting to stroll through.
Bonaventure Cemetery
330 Bonaventure Road
Savannah, Georgia, 31404
(912) 651-6843

Georgia Historical Society

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 24, 2000

The Georgia Historical Society, located across the street from Forsyth Park, is a research library. No books can be checked out, but if you want to know anything about the history of Georgia, this is the place to go. John Berendt, writer of 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil' spent some time in this library learning about the history of Savannah. There are a few historical books for sale, but not many.
Georgia Historical Society
501 Whitaker St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
+1 912 651 2125

Colonial Park Cemetery

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

While walking around the city looking at sites made famous by the book 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil' we ended up near Colonial Park Cemetery. We decided to walk through even though it wasn't on our planned tour, and we were amazed by some of the important historical figures we found resting there. Most surprising was a plaque that informed us that Nathaniel Greene, one of George Washington's most famous American Revolutionary Generals, had been buried in the cemetery for 114 years. His remains were moved with his son's remains to Johnson Square. Archibald Bulloch, Theodore Roosevelt's great-great grandfather, was in the graveyard. Button Gwinnett, who signed the Declaration of Independence, is probably the most important person in Georgia history that is buried in Colonial Park Cemetery. At the time of this journal writing (July---2000), Colonial Park is the only public cemetary in Savannah that is no longer active.
Colonial Park Cemetery
201 W Oglethorpe Ave
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 651-6843

Club One Jefferson

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by barbara on July 23, 2000

Club One is featured in the 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Book Tour' because it is where the colorful character Lady Chablis performs from time to time. For anyone who hasn't read the novel, Lady Chablis is a colorful drag-queen that the writer befriended. Club One has an interesting mix of homosexual and heterosexual patrons moving throughout its multiple floors, and the dance music is always awesome. The drag shows that are often put on at Club One (some starring the infamous Lady Chablis herself) are also a hoot. If those kind of things bother you, don't go to Club One. If you want to check it out, but you're just a little skiddish, don't be. Dance and let dance. It'll be a memorable experience.
Club One
1 Jefferson St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 232-0200

River Street Sweets

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by barbara on January 7, 2007

Opened first as a gift shop in 1973 by Georgia Nash and her daughter Pamela Strickland, River Street Sweets has grown into a Savannah institution. Located near the Hyatt on River Street itself, it's hard to miss because the sweet smells of wonderful things being freshly prepared are always wafting out the open doors.

While the fudge and bear claws are all tempting, the thing I love to get here the most is a freshly cooked praline. You'll discover there are often broken up samples of this delectable Southern treat to tempt you served right off the counter where a person will be busy making them, and I never, ever, ever go to River Street without buying at least one praline to eat as I walk up and down the river. They might seem expensive, but the sugary goodness just melts in your mouth. While they are sold packaged separately - and that's great if you have to travel with them - get one fresh because they are at their best just made... like hot Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Oh, the delight if you can get a praline still warm! How do I describe this confection? Sheer Southern heaven. Yummmmm.

If you can't make it to Savannah, River Street Sweets also has a location in Phipps Plaza in Atlanta as well as locations in Charleston and Myrtle Beach in South Carolina.

You can visit www.riverstreetsweets.com or call 1-800-SWEETS-6.

River Street Sweets
13 East River Street
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 234-4608

Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by barbara on January 17, 2007

Walking from the museum by the Tourist Information Center to go past the Civic Center and towards River Street, we saw the Juliette Low Birthplace beckoning to us from the corner of a lovely square.

As a girl, I proudly wore the Brownie beanie, diligently worked for merit badges as a Junior, and then finally crossed the bridge to Cadets before leaving the program. So OF COURSE I thought it was a good idea to pay homage to the lady who had started it all. My mother and I ponied up the $8 per adult ticket for the tour.

First, let's talk Juliette Gordon Low. Her friends and family always called her "Daisy." She was born into a prominent Southern family that had founded the railroad line that truly opened up economic prosperity for the region. Yet her mother was a fiery Yankee from Chicago who had gone to school with Sherman in her youth. (Sherman would be entertained in the very house where Juliette was born when he captured Savannah, though Juliette's father was a proud officer for the Confederate Army.) As a young woman, Juliette met and married a rake from England...though a very wealthy rake. Her husband was a womanizer who died early, thus leaving Juliette with some money. Still feeling like a failure in love (her husband's will left a sizable chunk o' change to the OTHER woman!), the new widow discovered her life's purpose when the founder of Boy Scouts asked her to help him with England's "Girl Guides." Juliette saw such value in the program, she brought it home to her own country and made her niece the very first registered Girl Scout in the United States.

Now let's talk about the tour of the house.

We had a delightful guide with an educated, distincly Georgian drawl take us through the home. Girl Scouts aside, I enjoyed the opportunity to view this fine example of regency architecture. The period furnishings were wonderful, including the hefty dining room chairs Juliette's father had specially made to support the weight of a rotund President Taft when he made a visit to the home. The best thing about the tour, however, was hearing the story of one of America's great families. With ties to both the North and the South, the histories of Juliette's many prominent relatives are interesting to hear about in their own right. No wonder Juliette herself grew to be a strong and accomplished woman!

Even if you weren't a Girl Scout, you'll find something worth hearing during a tour of this historic place. I'd highly suggest it to anyone visiting Savannah.

Phone: (912) 233-4501
Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace
10 East Oglethorpe Avenue
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 233-4501

Tour in Comfort

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by barbara on June 8, 2010

This trolley tour claims to be the best one in Savannah. As it's the only trolley tour I've ever taken, I can't argue. Plus, I really enjoyed the ride.

Where do you get onto a trolley and how much are tickets?
We purchased tickets across the street from the Savannah History Museum and Visitors' Center where we could park our car for free. To be honest, we chose this particular company rather randomly as there are several other companies operating trolley tours that also start here. Our tickets were $25 per adult. Kids' tickets were $10 each. That said, it's my understanding that if you plan ahead, you can purchase your tickets on-line at a discount.

What was the tour like?
I truly, really enjoyed our tour. We had a live guide, which is always a huge plus. His name was Tony, and he gave a nice presentation. He asked if anyone knew Juliet Gordon Lowe's nickname as we drove by her birthplace. When I shouted out "Daisy!", he played the Girl Scout pledge over the loud speaker because she was the founder of the Girl Scouts of America, and I confessed I was a Brownie. He pointed out the house that had running water twenty years before the White House. He told us that Catholics were frowned upon in Savannah during Colonial times because the Spanish in Florida were Catholics, and Georgia was settled by English Protestants. Military leaders were concerned if the Spanish ever invaded, Catholics in Savannah would take their side. He told us he understood real Southerners don't say things like "happy as a pig in mud" and "butter my biscuits." We loved Tony.

How long was the tour?
The tour is hop-on/hop-off, which means you can disembark at fifteen different points of interest to explore historic houses or to go shopping in City Market or to buy pralines on River Street. Therefore, you can use the trolleys as a way to move around the historic district without having to worry about parking. Trolleys get to each stop every 15 minutes. You can buy a more expensive ticket that includes other attractions at a discount. However, if you simply ride, the tour is around 90 minutes long.

Bottom line?
I found this to be a very pleasant activity well worth the money for anyone interested in the history of the city. I'd especially suggest it for someone who isn't familiar with Savannah. Go on the first day of vacation to get introduced to some of the other things you might want to explore while adjusting to the Georgia heat.
Savannah Trolley Tours
234 Martin Luther King Jr
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
(912) 233-0083

A Comfortable Place for Lunch

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by barbara on June 10, 2010

Conveniently located near River Street on Bay Street, about two blocks from City Market, Moon River is a casual place to buy a reasonable lunch. We chose to grab a bite here as my husband likes microbreweries, my mother likes Johnny Mercer (the Savannah song writer who penned Moon River), and we all liked the location.

What was it like?
Walking into the restaurant, you see the bar first. Look to the left and you'll find brewing equipment behind plexi-glass. Then there are a couple of colorfully decorated rooms for dining so a larger party can be accommodated. We ended up in the back where a screen had been pulled down so a party of local men in khakis and loafers could watch horse races.

How about the menu?
Here was a wide range of American choices with a Southern influence. You could get anything from a salmon filet as an entree to fried green tomatoes. We honed in on the sandwiches and wraps, which were very reasonably priced ($6-9) for a mid-day meal. I chose "Kristine's Favorite", which could parade through my mind as healthy because it's a turkey sandwich served on whole wheat bread. Of course, it's the brie cheese, candied pecans, and cranberry sauce that made it tasty. Everyone else was also happy with their assortment of burgers, onion rings, and wraps. My husband ordered an India Pale Ale (the Swamp Fox), which he said was also very good.

How was the service?
Polite and adequate. The kitchen got a little backed up at one point with a rush of other diners, but the waitress let us know, so we didn't get impatient.

Bottom Line?
We were happy with our meal. We were also happy to discover a coupon for Moon River on a flyer we received when we bought our Old Town Trolley tickets. If you're combining lunch and a tour, the restaurant is only a couple blocks walk from the Old Town trolley stop #14. If you're not on a trolley tour, Moon River is near the corner where Club One made famous in the book In the Garden of Midnight and Evil sits.
Moon River Brewing Company
21 West Bay St
Savannah, Georgia, 31401
+1 912 447 0943

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