Washington, D.C.

Although every building is practically white, you can find so many different things to do based on the colorful culture of American politics in Washington, D.C. This is an account of all of the events my group did.


Washington, D.C.

Member Rating 0 out of 5 by mafnet on November 11, 2006

My favorite stop was the Capitol. I was fortunate enough to actually go inside! Seeing many different rooms and places was wonderful!${QuickSuggestions} Don't waste your time trying to hit every Smithsonian museum. It is estimated that it would take some 80 years (I cannot recall the exact number) if you looked at every item for a couple of seconds). You get the idea. You will never see everything, so don't waste your time trying.${BestWay} Bus tours are the best way to get around. You go everywhere you may think. However, this limits you timewise. If you want to rent a car, go ahead, but traffic picks up at rush hour.

The National Air & Space Museum

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

Out of the many buildings of the Smithsonian, my group went to this one. There are replica of space ships along with real shuttles, planes, flying machines, etc. This is one of the most interactive museums of the Smithsonian collection. There is a whole exhibit on flight (i.e. the mechanics, wind currents, experiments, etc.) that kids and adults can enjoy together. Also, there is a model spaceship that you can walk through. It is a wonderful sight if you have the time! Take your whole family! You will not regret it!
Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum
Independence Avenue At 4th Street SW
Washington, DC

Arlington National Cemetery

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

This place shattered the reputation of all other cemeteries. It is one of the most beautiful places in the United States. Although each cross and tombstone has a tragic story behind it, there is a history of a nation rising from war and trial, growing into a country of strength. Featuring objects such as the mast from the U.S.S Maine, the eternal flame commemorating Kennedy's life, various monuments to various presidents, and Arlington House. All of these beautiful sites evoke emotion and patriotism. The most memorable of events was the laying of the wreath at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Looking back, it was a great choice to stop here. The site, although melancholy, was overpoweringly lovely.
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, Virginia
Arlington, Virginia, 22211
(703) 607-8000

FDR Monument

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

One of our stops was the FDR monument. Overall, the rather new monument payed much respect to the former president. Even though he had issues with health and was sometimes confined to a wheelchair, the major statue of him portrays him on a disproportionate chair with wheels. It looks much like a chair, but there are wheels the size of a fist, nothing like a wheelchair for the handicapped. Other monuments struck me as bizarre while some took my breath away. Although there is little for me to say about this one, I suggest that you stop by anyway. It is very close to others.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Ohio Drive SW
Washington, D.C., United States
(202) 376-6704

Korean War Memorial

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

An eerie memorial showing both etched faces looking out and the reflections of statues within, this memorial was quite emotional for me. My grandfather served in Korea, and although I knew his name was not on the wall, I wondered what it was like for the soldiers to march in a foreign land. The wall itself is much like the Vietnam Memorial aside from the "marching soldiers." Stop here. It is another historical place of value.
Korean War Veterans Memorial
French Drive SW
Washington, D.C., United States, 20024

Lincoln Memorial

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

This monument has Lincoln sitting along in a giant chair. Alongside are words from various documents on stone. Up the steps, one can see the names of every state on the roof. The president stares out upon D.C., firmly. His accomplishments have been preserved by this monument, so if you have the time, check it out for yourself.
Lincoln Memorial
West Potomac Park
Washington, DC, 20037
(202) 426-6895

Mount Vernon

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

The house is lovely, resting right on the Potamac River. Look at all the paintings and artifacts left in the house; they are a tie to the history of George Washington. Here lies the first president, moved to a new tomb that is forever guarded by soldiers. Look out upon the green pastures as the sun beats down on the grass. Look out to the river to watch the boats pass. Nothing here is out of place.
George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate and Gardens
3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Highway
Mount Vernon, VA, 22121
(703) 780-2000

The Awakening

Member Rating 2 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

This monument portrays a giant rising out of a sandbar. I have seen kids play on the monument, look at the monument, run around the monument. Adults simply stare baffled at the monument. It is a little bizarre. It isn't really tied to American history although it is supposedly symbolic in itself. Not my top choice for a visit.
The Awakening
National Harbor
Oxon Hill, MD, 20745

The Capitol Building

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

Our group leader had ties in the Capitol, so we actually went inside! We saw what it is like to sit in the House! It is grand! Through the halls are statues, two from every state. One of the most notable is from Hawaii. A missionary with leprosy. Such a humble man had to wear a barrel and then his clothes, for his skin was easily irritated. Such figures are common, great and small. Even if you cannot get in, climb the steps, walk around. You're bound to run into a congressman at any time!
U.S. Capitol Building
Capitol Hill
Washington, DC
(202) 225-6827

The White House

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

Unfortunately, the White House is not open for tours, but we got to see it from the outside. Honestly, I wasn't as impressed with it as I was when I saw pictures. It is still beautiful and all, but it doesn't have that same splendor people always surround it with. Stop here anyway. It is historical. It is one of the first true American monumental buildings. Or if you want, there is a protester outside who has protested the war for many years.
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, D.C., 20500
(202) 456-2121

Washington Monument

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

Composed of two different types of stone from two different quarries, this statues is more beautiful than actually depicted. It is even larger than some pictures make it seem! The monument is next to a giant reflecting pool for all to see. This monument is a small skyscraper, reaching high into the sky. There is a way to get to the top, but I am uncertain as to how much it costs. Just stay outside though, the view is gorgeous.
Washington Monument
Near the Center of the National Mall
Washington, D.C., 20024
(202) 426-6841

Washington National Cathedral

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

My group stopped here during a Mayday festival (or something like it). The festival was some kind of flower festival, everyone donned Renaissance clothing, and the cathedral was open. Tours are an option. The cathedral displays life size stained glass windows, one of which has a piece of moon rock embedded into it (courtesy of the Apollo missions). Various people are buried in the church, including one of our past presidents! Every now and again, prayer goes over the intercom. The church has a gigantic organ and many other features! Stop on by when you can!
Washington National Cathedral
Massachusetts and Wisconsin Avenues, NW
Washington, D.C., 20016
(202) 537-6200

Holocaust Museum

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

A very powerful museum, the exhibits don't hold back. They show the true massacre and decimation. There are video monitors that are surrounded by concrete walls: if you are tall enough to look over them, you may be old enough to see them. Some pictures are so gory, that they cannot be seen by kids. The sights are so tragic that people are left in tears. There are models of crematoriums, an exhibit showing how many shoes were removed from the victims of the Holocaust (a room full of them), clothes, pictures, diaries, etc. If you have been to the Simon Wiesenthal Holocaust Museum in L.A., you will know that that one is modeled exactly like the pathways through Germany. Almost everything there is video. Here, it is photo and even more disturbing than the other. If you are faint hearted or your kids are, I advise you to think otherwise.
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, Sw
Washington, D.C., United States, 20024
(202) 488-0400

The National Museum of American History

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

We stopped here for a brief time, but the place exhibits many things ranging from music to campaigning. One of my favorite exhibits was all of the campaigning posters and pins puts on display. Another exhibit featured coins from many countries, including a database of all of them. If you enjoy American history, stop on by!
Smithsonian National Museum of American History
14th Street And Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 357-1300

National Museum of Natural History

Member Rating 3 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

The last stop of the Smithsonian my group made. The first floor features an exhibit of dinosaurs and various flora and fauna. Although we could only stay for a few minutes, this place, home of the Hope Diamond, was a great stop. Personally, I enjoyed the history museum more though.
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
10th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
(202) 633-1000

Ford's Theatre

Member Rating 5 out of 5 by mafnet on November 20, 2006

This is where Lincoln was assassinated. Story goes that Booth blocked the door and, when the funniest line of the play brought tumultuous laughter, shot the president. The former actor, in a mad fit, jumped off the balcony yelling (in Latin) "Thus always to tyrants" and ran off with a broken leg to a warehouse. He and a couple of his helpers were hung, including one woman. The place was later bought out and converted into an office until the second floor gave out and collapsed. It has been remodeled since to look like the original theatre. Go ahead and visit this place! It once again is very historical. For me, it was great! It was a place I had heard of over and over again in history class. To actually visit it was like a dream! The red fabric, the red seats, the balcony itself all brought back what it must have been like on that fatal day.
Ford's Theatre
511 10th Street Nw
Washington, D.C., 20004
(202) 347-4833

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