Boston by Subway - How to Get Where You Want To Be

It's easy to sightsee Boston using the city's famous MBTA - the oldest subway system in the US.


Boston by Subway - How to Get Where You Want To Be

Member Rating 0 out of 5 by Alyssa on November 19, 2000

Boston's subway transit system has improved since the famous song about "Charlie and the MBTA"--"No, he never returned, he never returned...and his fate is still unlearned." The wheels may squeak, but you can still get there from here--from most anywhere in Boston to wherever it is you want to go in the city. Here then is a primer to getting around town and leaving the driving to them.${QuickSuggestions} The Park Street station on the red line in the center of Boston is the hub for the MBTA system--with red and green lines radiating out from there, as well as connections to the other main lines. Start here to get your bearings, find your way around town, and get bus infomation for suburban forways or cross-town routes. ${BestWay} The red line connects Boston with Cambridge, so you can ride direct from downtown Boston to Harvard Square, over the river, in Cambridge. Travel time is about 15 minutes. Or, for prime tourist attractions, take the green line from Park Street station (the train marked "Lechmere" or "Government Center") one stop to Government Center to Quincy Market, a short walk from historic Faneuil Hall, the restaurants and shops.

Harvard Square and Harvard University

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by Alyssa on November 19, 2000

Harvard Square is where the action is--for visitors and residents alike. A quaint, eclectic area originating with the birth of Harvard College in the 1600's, it still has remnants of the twisty streets and historic buildings established at the time the university was founded. This is the center of cafe life in the Boston-Cambridge area, and there is a wide choice of places to plop down and people watch--from the always-busy snack-and-brew emporium, Au Bon Pain, in the center of the Square, to the precious, tiny and robust TeaLuxe, on Brattle Street nearby, where the selection of teas is plentiful and astonishing. Upstairs at the Harvard Coop Cafe you can browse the magazines and books to your heart's content, then take a stroll in Harvard Yard across the street where the legendary statue of John Harvard is a photogenic focal point. Shopping the Square will give you stores like Abercrombie & Fitch, the Gap, HMV and many small specialty shops including Cardullo's, the famous food importer, with chocolate, cheese, coffees and you-name-it from around the world. Explore the side streets for some interesting discoveries and savor the cuisine of the Square--from Bertucci's Brick Oven Pizzeria on Brattle Street to Grendel's at 89 Winthrop, a favorite Harvard hang-out, to Henrietta's Table in the Charles Hotel at One Bennett. All of this is just four subway stops from Park Street on the Red Line--a quick trip from Boston's Hub to a neighborhood of endless fascination.
Harvard Square

Boston, Massachusetts

Quincy Market

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by Alyssa on November 19, 2000

From Park Street, take the Green Line (any car marked "Lechmere," "North Station," or "Government Center") one stop to Government Center. Take the escalator upstairs and walk across City Hall Plaza, down the steps and across the street to Faneuil (pronounced like "spaniel") Hall, birthplace of the American Revolution. Just behind this beautifully restored American landmark are the shops known as Quincy Market, the brainchild of a Cambridge architect, who transformed the old warehouses from the days of the shipping trade into a tourist mecca, with double corridors of glass-canopied restauarants, boutiques and specialty shops. The twinkling lights in the trees along the pedestrian walkways made of some of the original cobblestone transform Quincy Market into a fairyland vision at night. You can spend days here and not see it all. Walk though the market heading east, cross the street (under the overpass) and into Columbus Park which borders Boston's Italian North End and the waterfront, with a picturesque view of the harbor and boats in their moorings.
Quincy Market
Faneuil Hall Market Place
Boston, Massachusetts, 02109
(617) 523-1300

Newbury Street Shopping Mecca

Member Rating 4 out of 5 by Alyssa on November 19, 2000

Boston's Newbury Street is the fashion mecca of the Hub. Just three stops from Park Street on the Green Line (take any outbound car, "Boston College," "Heath Street," "Cleveland Circle," or "Riverside") and get out at Copley (pronounced "cop-lee"). Copley Square features two special architectural treasures, historic Trinity Church (it's worth a look inside to see the stained glass windows and vaunting structure) and the sleekly modern John Hancock Building, a towering structure of glass. (Trinity Church reflected in the Hancock windows is a favorite subject for photographers). The imposing Boston Public Library faces Trinity Church, and Newbury Street is one block towards the Charles River and Commonwealth Avenue. The lower numbers of Newbury St. feature the most swank addresses, starting with the Ritz Carlton Hotel, which faces the Public Garden, continuing with chi-chi designer shops (Armani Emporio at 210 Newbury; and the Armani Cafe next door at 214 Newbury, the place to Be Seen); jewelers, (Dorfman, at 24 Newbury, for spectacular gems)and art galleries such as Chase at number 129, featuring up-and-coming artists. Further up Newbury Street, as the number of students increases, so do the bookstores, artsy cafes and the 3-story CD palace, Tower Records.
Newbury Street
Back Bay Area
Boston, Massachusetts, 02116

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