Montenegro Journals

Crna Gora - Montenegro

A July 2001 trip to Montenegro by rhiannon1968

montenegro Photo, Montenegro, Europe More Photos
Quote: Montenegro - politically part of Yugoslavia, culturally part of anywhere else, or preferable independent. Home of smugglers and welcoming people - green seas anf grey mountains: a land of contradictions

Crna Gora - Montenegro

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Overview

montenegro Photo, Montenegro, Europe
Quote:
Definitely the people: always charming, always nice, always helpful. I was made welcome because of my Italian origins, and my traveling companion, Zoran from Croatia, was made welcome because Croatia had been opposed to Serbia in the Balcan war. Everywhere we went, we were treated like family. Thank you, wonderful Montenegrin peopleQuick Tips: Bring Euros as your currency, you won't be able to use anything else. And do bring plenty of coins - when I was there the currency was the DM and people never seemed to have coins to give you backBest Way To Get Around: The best thing is to rent a car. There are buses but they are infrequent or non-existing. In summer 2001 there was no bus conn...Read More

the town of Budva

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Story/Tip

budva Photo, Budva, Montenegro
Quote:
Budva, the miniature Dubrovnik… it’s poor sister, but only apparently. It felt like being off-the-beaten-path in a place definitely full of tourists: it was a weird feeling. But let’s start from the beginning: Budva, founded by the Phoenicians, the main city on the Montenegrin Coast, one of the last stops before Albania. From the distance it looked like a beautiful peaceful, sleepy walled town of old origins – from close-up it looked exactly the same, except sleepy. Sandy beaches can be found all around the town, and the water is bright blue and inviting. Plenty of people seemed to spend their holidays there and, because Montenegro is a very cheap country, nearly all tourism comes from the Slavic repu...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on February 15, 2002

the town of Kotor

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Story/Tip

kotor Photo, Kotor, Montenegro
Quote:
The ancient city of Kotor was our first stop into Montenegro: it’s the oldest town and also the most historical and best-preserved of all: not casually it’s a UNESCO heritage site. Kotor is a bit of an architectural melting pot. I’m probably not too wrong to assume that it has absorbed from all the cultures of the people who have inhabited it through the centuries: Illyrians, Romans, Hungarians, Serbians, Venetians, French and Austrians. It once used to be a very important maritime and trade centre, although its evident now that the time of wine and roses is well past. Its beauty is unchanged, however and it’s starts from the very beginning as you enter the town’s walls. Some s...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on February 15, 2002

King Nikola's Museum (State Museum)

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Attraction | "the town of Cetinje"

King Nikola's Museum (State Museum) Photo, Montenegro, Europe
Quote:
Cetinje, Montenegro’s ancient capital city (Podgorica is today’s capital) lies half way between Kotor and Budva, but inland, up the mountains. Montenegro, in Italian, means black mountain: the mountains inland are actually not black, but their dominant colour is surely grey: they are barren, inhospitable, uninviting, but charming nonetheless To reach Cetinje one has to drive up the "serpentine road" - with 29 hair pin turns with steep cliffs on either side. From the top the views over 32 kilometres long Boka Kotorka (Bay of Kotor) are simply amazing and surreal – if it were not for the Mediterranean vegetation one would think it’s a Norwegian fjord that one is seeing. In Cetinje there ...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on February 15, 2002

King Nikola's Museum (State Museum)
Town of Cetinje
Cetinje, Montenegro

Quote:
Shopping in Montenegro was like going back to my childhood days when my parents used to buy groceries in Italy and, because of the lack of 5 lire coins, cashiers used to give us back candies and sweets in return. When I was a kid, we were all bugging our parents to shop in Italy and not in Switzerland. Something similar happened to us all over Montenegro. When I was there the official currency was the Deutsch Mark (it’s the euro now), but coins were hard to come by. My traveling companion, Zoran, went to buy a newspaper in Kotor and came back giggling, with a newspaper in one hand and a small shampoo bottle in the other – they had run out of coins. Later on it was my turn: I needed a packet of cigar...Read More
Quote:
Visas, oh do we need one? Montenegro is supposedly one of the two remaining Republics of Yugoslavia. Well, this is the official Yugoslavian version - the Montenegrin one is slightly different and contradictory. So Yugoslavia requires a visa to enter the country? Well, just to spite Yugoslavia Montenegro doesn't ask you for one – and they officially are actually pretty happy to see that you don’t have one; you’re supporting their secessionist cause. True, Serbian and Yugoslavian police could theoretically arrest you if you are found without a visa, but normally they don’t like to venture into Montenegro – as they are officially not welcome. A passport is normally required – but...Read More