Rajasthan Journals

Mewar: The Silver Triangle of Rajasthan

Best of IgoUgo

An August 2011 trip to Rajasthan by phileasfogg

In Mewar Photo, Rajasthan, India More Photos
Quote: India’s Golden Triangle – Delhi-Agra-Jaipur – is well-known. But, though the ‘Silver Triangle’ appellation’s my own, I think it’s suitable. It's a land of white palaces and silvery lakes; a region so unpolluted, the stars are sequins in a velvet sky… yes, Mewar is the Silver Triangle.

Eight Days of Driving through Mewar

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

In Mewar Photo, Rajasthan, India
Quote:
Rajasthan is traditionally divided into three regions: Marwar, Shekhavati, and Mewar. Marwar is known for the business acumen of its people. Shekhavati comes second, with some of India’s biggest business magnates originally hailing from the area. (For tourists, though, Shekhavati’s main draw are its many grandly painted mansions).And Mewar is one of Rajasthan’s greenest areas – thanks to the Chambal River, the state’s only perennial river. This is a land that's been ruled by some of the fiercest warriors in Rajasthan’s history. It’s also, for tourists, one of Rajasthan’s most glit...Read More

Eklingji Temple Complex

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "A Complex of 108 Ancient Temples"

Eklingji Temple Complex Photo, Udaipur, India
Quote:
According to tradition, the ‘Maharanas’ of Mewar became the rulers of the territory of Udaipur and its surrounding area around AD 734. That was when a Hindu sage gave the first Maharana, Bappa Rawal, the guardianship of the area by appointing Bappa Rawal (and his descendants) the ‘Diwans of Eklingji on Earth’ (a ‘Diwan’ was a high-ranking state official, similar to a regent or a prime minister). Eklingji, literally ‘the single-phallused one’, is a term used for the Hindu deity Shiva, the destroyer in the Hindu trinity.Ever since, the Maharanas of Mewar have revered Eklingji; and the shrine of Eklingji – in the tiny village of Kelashpuri, 22 km from Udaipur – has been an important part of their doma...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on October 6, 2011

Eklingji Temple Complex
Kailashpuri
Udaipur, Rajasthan

Devi Garh Restaurant

Best Of IgoUgo

Restaurant | "Simply Delicious Food"

Devi Garh Restaurant Photo, Udaipur, India
Quote:
My association with Devigarh goes back more than ten years, to when this boutique hotel was first being set up. I was taken on board as a freelance consultant to help draw up plans for dining room equipment – crockery, cutlery, linen and the like. Later, when the very hands-on owner of Devigarh, Anupam Poddar, discovered I also had a flair for writing, if I’d help him by writing the content for the hotel’s web site. So I did. The site’s changed a bit ever since, but the original text was mine. Anupam magnanimously offered that Devigarh would play host any time I wanted to visit.Well, my husband and I weren’t planning at a...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 6, 2011

Devi Garh Restaurant
Devigarh Fort Palace
Udaipur, Rajasthan

Town of Nathdwara

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "Religion is Big Business"

Town of Nathdwara Photo, Rajasthan, India
Quote:
If Eklingji is the deity for the Maharanas of Mewar – the royalty of Udaipur – then Nathdwara is the deity for the business magnates. India’s wealthiest family (and one of the wealthiest in the world), the Ambanis, are among the many high-profile multi-billionaires who make annual pilgrimages to this shrine to offer prayers and seek the blessings of the idol installed here.Nathdwara, literally ‘the gate of the deity’, lies 48 km from Udaipur, further along the highway that connects Eklingji to Udaipur. (It’s a convenient day trip, therefore, to both places in one journey – you go to Nathdwara, see the temple there, and on your way back, stop over at Eklingji to see the temples there)...Read More

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on October 6, 2011

Town of Nathdwara
48 Km From Udaipur
Rajasthan

Chittorgarh Fort and Ruins

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "A Fort of Many Legends"

Chittorgarh Fort and Ruins Photo, Chittorgarh, India
Quote:
When we were children, we’d often come across ‘tales of valour’ – of warrior kings and their glorious deeds. We’d read about, watch plays about, and even hear poetry about people like the brave Maharana Pratap and his faithful steed, Chetak. Then there was the royal wet nurse Panna Dhai, who, to keep the orphaned prince alive and well, put her own son in the prince’s cradle, thus hoodwinking the enemy and saving the prince. Some stories, like that of Meera, the high-born lady who became a devote...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on October 6, 2011

Chittorgarh Fort and Ruins
South Of Bhilwara
Rajasthan