Stiffkey Journals

Seafood and Real Ales in Stiffkey

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A September 2011 trip to Stiffkey by sararevell

Blacksmiths Cottage Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk More Photos
Quote: On the north coast of Norfolk, the tiny village of Stiffkey is easy to miss but it makes an excellent base for coastal walks, fresh seafood and a spot of antique shopping. Nearby, the Real Ale Shop sells over 50 ales made by local brewers.

Blacksmiths Cottage

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Hotel | "A Fine Flint Stone Retreat"

Blacksmiths Cottage Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk
Quote:
The larger of the two accommodations at Blacksmiths Cottages is a clean, cosy, historic three bedroomed cottage. The neat flintstone house manages to contain an air of calm and quiet in spite of its proximity to the cars that whip by on the A149.We arrived at the cottage after dark and found that both parking spaces had been commandeered by people staying in the smaller cottage next door. This meant we had to park on Bridge Street. While it is barely a minute’s walk away, the dark, narrow country road has no pavement meaning that the short trek is a little intimidating, if not dangerous.Fortunately, the welcome at the cottage is a world away from the hazardous road that runs pa...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 4, 2011

Blacksmiths Cottage
Church Street
Stiffkey, Norfolk

Stiffkey Red Lion

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Restaurant | "Eat, Drink, Lobster, Ale"

Stiffkey Red Lion Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk
Quote:
About a five minute walk from Blacksmith’s Cottage is the Red Lion pub. We set out for dinner on a Saturday evening not knowing how popular the place would be. We arrived around 6.30pm to find that all of the tables inside had ‘reserved’ plaques on them and immediately regretted not calling ahead. We asked at the bar if and where a free table might be found and by luck they had a cancellation, freeing up a table for five by the front door. This multi-roomed inn apparently started life as a pub in the early 1600s but has also served as a doctor’s surgery and a private home before resuming service to the public in the 1990s. We ordered drinks at the bar. Local ales are on tap and...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 4, 2011

Stiffkey Red Lion
44 Wells Road
Stiffkey, Norfolk NR23 1AJ
01328 830552

The Real Ale Shop Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk
Quote:
The village of Stiffkey may only be barely a mile long but it is well worth a half hour stop (or more if you fancy lunch or dinner at The Red Lion). Along the main street is a small, eye catching antiques and lamp shop (www.stiffkeyantiques.com). The main shop is a narrow, two storey crammed with an incredible array of door handles, latches, hooks, letterboxes and of course lamps. There is also a wide range of fireplace accessories such as grates, guards brushes and pokers as well as other fantastic but pricey antiques for the home. We stopped in late on a Saturday afternoon and swiftly picked up a fireguard and a brush, tray and poker. The one bizarre aspect of the shop is that even all the pieces ar...Read More
Morston Quay Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk
Quote:
The four mile walk from Stiffkey to Blakeney is part of the Norfolk Coast Path, also known as Peddars Way. While on the map, the route looks like it follows the coast, the name is a little misleading in that you only get distant glimpses of the coast along the way. The winding inlets and marshes ensure that along this stretch, the sea is always almost always out of sight and reach. That’s not to say that it isn’t a pleasant walk. It is a flat and easy path to negotiate and even has a snack shop and toilet stop just past the mid way point at Morston Quay. Starting at Stiffkey we walked west along Wells Road until we reached the antiques shop. Here there is a footpath that heads north toward...Read More

Seafood Sandwich Lunch in Blakeney

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Story/Tip

Lunch in Blakeney Photo, Stiffkey, Norfolk
Quote:
Reaching Blakeney by way of the Norfolk Coast Path, we were immediately greeted by the imposing but beautiful Blakeney hotel. The hotel is on one side of a small horseshoe quay where small boats were beached in the shallow low tide. We walked along The Quay until we reached the end of the high street, where seafood vendors set up shop for hungry walkers and wooden picnic tables are scattered alongside a far reaching car park. It was here that we decided to take a rest stop and take advantage of the fresh seafood on offer. The two stalls open that day sold seafood on the left, and paninis and other less fishy sandwiches on the right for those who with shellfish allergies or aversions....Read More