Argentina Journals

Planning Spanish-Speaking Southern South America

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A travel journal to Argentina by SeenThat

Buenos Aires Photo, Buenos Aires, Argentina More Photos
Quote: South America is not Asia; it is less user-friendly and offers less quality for more money. Yet, it probably is one of the most fascinating areas in the world, offering islands floating in the skies, beaches at various altitudes and some of the most beautiful mountains in the world.

Landing in a New Continent

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Story/Tip

Buenos Aires Photo, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Quote:
Landing in a new continent may be exhilarating but also confusing. Where to start? Where to go? South America is large and underdeveloped; meaning that exploring it takes time, patience and pain. Culturally it can be divided in two main parts: Spanish and Portuguese speaking areas. The Spanish speaking part is also a dichotomy divided between the Andes Mountains and the lowlands by the Atlantic Ocean. Most of us can dedicate only a limited amount of time to an exploratory trip; one month is about right for such an adventure. How to organize it so that a significant part of the attractions is visited without transforming the trip into an endless stay at boring terminuses? This journal presents a feasib...Read More

Northwards to Asuncion del Paraguay

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Tributary Photo, Asuncion, Paraguay
Quote:
One of the best parts of traveling is learning to use local transports as a denizen; after having done that in Asia, where often I was unable even to read the signs, South America turned out being a piece of empanada. In Buenos Aires, it meant getting to know Retiro.RetiroRetiro is located south of the exclusive Recoleta neighborhood and north of San Nicolas and is the main travel hub of Buenos Aires. Its name originates in a grand mansion that occupie...Read More

Westwards through the Paraguayan Chaco

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Chaco Photo, Paraguay, South America
Quote:
After a quick snack at the Lido Bar, I crossed the street to Asuncion’s central plaza and decided to make a quick survey of the center despite the heat and the bright, burning sun. The first hours in a place provide the strongest, more long-lasting impressions and I wanted to take advantage of that.The Plaza de los Heroes was a typical colonial one, except for the fact that two perpendicular streets divided it in quarters and that one of the corners – next to the Chile and Palma junction and to the Lido Bar – was occupied by the Panteon de los Heroes (Heroes Pantheon). The last was a ghastly reminder of the country bloody and disastrous wars; avoiding it, I walked around the plaza and foun...Read More

Upwards to the Andes

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The Port of Arica Photo, Chile, South America
Quote:
From Santa Cruz the path is upwards; Cochabamba and La Paz being the first destinations. Since I recently reviewed in detail this country - see Planning Bolivia and my other Bolivian journals – the descriptions here would be skeletal and refer only to the travel planning considerations of such a trip.CochabambaThe fourth biggest city in ...Read More

Southwards to the Highest Mountain

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Empty Fountain Photo, Sucre, Bolivia
Quote:
Southwards from La Paz, things become rather simple from the traveler’s perspective. Oruro, maybe Sucre, Potosi and then back to Argentina.OruroCarnival is the main - and some say the only - attraction in Oruro. UNESCO recognized it as ...Read More

Eastwards and Downwards

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Mendoza Photo, Mendoza, Argentina
Quote:
In my Roaming Argentina journal, I described a bus trip from La Quiaca to Mendoza. Essentially, the trip from Salta to Mendoza needed for this trip is not different and equally spectacular, crossing the Argentinean northwest very close to the Andes Range. Eventually, after crossing Catamarca, La Rioja, and San Juan, Mendoza is reached.MendozaBefore reaching it, Mendoza statistics seemed impressive: it is Argentina’s fourth largest city. That’s true, but the town has just above a hundred thousand inhabitants. Even including its metropolitan area, it doesn’t reach the ...Read More