Oman Journals

More From Oman

Best of IgoUgo

A travel journal to Oman by TianjinPaul

Quote: More thoughts from my time in Oman

The Turning

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
During my time in Oman, I would often take route 11 from my home in Rustaq to the town of Barka where there was a large supermarket and a licensed alcohol store, where I would gleefully spend the 30 O.R of booze that my license allowed me each month. The drive between the two towns is spectacular. It winds through the mountains and Wadis before dragging out onto dusty desert plains. Almost exactly at the point where the mountains dissipated into the desert was a secluded turning that snaked back into the mountains and disappeared quickly from viewThe turning always fascinated me. It was so secretive and the tarmac disappeared into the mountains so quickly that it had a wonderful air of mys...Read More

Societal Gap

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
This particular journal entry begins on my first evening in the town of Rustaq. I had in the afternoon having spent my first couple of nights in Oman in a rather nice hotel in the capital, Muscat. After a three hour bus ride through the desert, I was hot, sweaty and in need of a shower. Thankfully, my company's fixer, Ayoub, was on hand to help me move in. After collecting my colleagues and I from the bus, he stuffed three of use and our luggage into his 4x4 and set about getting us moved in.As my apartment was the nearest, I was first to be dropped off. After pulling into the dusty courtyard behind my apartment block we drew to a halt, Ayoub popped the trunk and the to of us jumped out. I...Read More

The Roundabouts of Oman

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
Oman can, at times be a rather faceless country. The vast majority of its territory is made up of sprawling desert that looks like the surface of the Moon. For this reason, driving can be a rather mundane experience. There are the occasional roads that run along the coast or wind through the mountains. However, there is also hundreds and hundreds of miles of straight highway that leaves the average motorist feeling unbelievably bored. Clearly, someone close to Sultan Qaboos and the Omani government noticed this a few years ago and embarked on a fascinating project – the beautification of the country’s roundabouts.The highway between Sohar and Muscat is a fine example of the bring terrain a...Read More

My Little Yaris

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
It was the most tearful of fair-wells. I was leaving Oman and saying good-bye to my closest travelling companion, my car. As I handed back the keys to the white Yaris that I had rented for almost six months, I began to tear up and remember some of the fantastic times I had enjoyed in Oman, almost all of which had involved my plucky four-wheeled friend. Before this journal entry begins to descends into an advert for a certain Japanese car manufacturer, please allow me to explain a little bit about travelling around Oman. This may, in turn, explain why I loved my little car so much.Transport in Oman is patchy at best. There are a few high-speed, air-conditioned buses that run between major c...Read More

Leaving on a Jet Plane

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
For tourists visiting the Sultanate of Oman, leaving is a relatively simple process. They can just show their passport at immigration and the officer will put a stamp on their tourist visa in way of cancellation. They are then free to leave. For those who have lived in Oman, things are a little different. If you are leaving for a vacation and intend to return, things could not be more simple. When I took my Christmas vacation to the UK, the only time I showed my passport was when I checked in for my flight. The rest of the process was completely automated. All I needed to do was swipe my Omani resident card at immigration and I ambled through to my flight. However, when I left for good, the process wa...Read More