La Paz Journals

Across the Death Dishes

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A travel journal to La Paz by SeenThat

General Cemetery (Cementerio General) Photo, La Paz, Bolivia More Photos
Quote: On strange dishes available next to a bizarre cemetry…

General Cemetery (Cementerio General)

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Attraction | "On Death Dishes and a Bizarre Graveyard"

General Cemetery (Cementerio General) Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Spanning roughly 800m in altitude between its upper and lower parts, La Paz is easy to enjoy from a bird’s eye. If standing along the Andean High Plateau’s rim, then the General Cemetery stands out right below the upper cliffs. Long pavilions are here densely packed, resembling some kind of macabre factory. In a sense, this is accurate. After all, you wouldn’t expect a normal cemetery in this bizarre part of the world. The pavilions contain rows of niches where the coffins are stored for as long as the family pays the annual fee. Afterwards, the families pick up the skulls and the other b...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on September 12, 2010

General Cemetery (Cementerio General)
Av. Baptista
La Paz, Bolivia

Api Orurenyo

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Restaurant | "On a Soupy Coffee"

Buñuelo Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Few drinks are more distinctive and typical of the area than api. Its bright purple color is unusual for a drink; little else is needed for drawing the attention of the crowds walking the streets. During the early hours of the day, this is the favorite drink of Bolivians, probably because it is served very hot and the plateau is very cold. Another point of interest for travelers reaching the area is that api is a truly indigenous drink. At the lower corner of the Cemetery and along the main avenue leading to it is an excellent shop serving api. Api Orureño is its name.Maize is native of the Americas, where it exists in many varieties. However, consumption techniques vary from place to plac...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on September 12, 2010

Jakonta

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Restaurant | "On a Thick Soup"

Jakonta Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Heavy soups are typical of the Andean High Plateau and an excellent way to warm up in this cold crest of the world. The variety of soups is large; "jakonta" is a soup which is seldom found in downtown restaurants, but very popular in the markets. As such, it was perfect for this journal.I entered the covered market from the gate nearest to the cemetery and saw a sign announcing "jakonta." It was still early – slightly before 10 AM, i.e. before sunrise for most Bolivians – and thus the stall was empty. The surprised cook raised her eyebrows, but took my order without questions. Talking the local Spanish dialect diverts most questions regarding why an obvious foreigner chooses such local del...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on September 12, 2010

Quijada

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Restaurant | "On a Goat with Bad Teeth"

Quijada Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Technically, "quijada" (kee-ha-dah) means just "jaw" in Spanish; however, in Bolivian markets it invariably refers to goat’s jaws. In the same way "cabeza" refers to goat’s heads. Both dishes can be found at the same stalls since goat’s skulls are cut there in four, creating four dishes: two cabezas and two quijadas. I haven’t seen them in downtown restaurants, but they are popular in all food markets, and these are ubiquitous in La Paz. Deciding between a serving of jaw or head was easy. The brain is a fatty tissue, and goats tend to have a strong residual taste in their fat. Quijada was my choice."Una quijada por favor," I said while desperately searching for a place to sit.T...Read More

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on September 12, 2010

Fruits and Beer Malt

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Restaurant | "Batido? Carambola!"

Fruit Stalls, General Cemetery Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Following the last and weird meal, I needed to wash the residual flavors. On the upper and outer side of the market ("up" and "down" are the two most useful directions in La Paz) is a row of fruit juice stalls. Bolivia offers awesome fruits, in amazing quantities and a breathtaking variety. So much, that piles of rotting fruits can be seen at the Rodriguez Market and next to the General Cemetery Market at the end of each day. Mangos, custard apples and tumbos are the most interesting options. Grapes, papayas, watermelons and others were too ordinary to be of interest. For the sake of my readers I too...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on September 12, 2010

About the Writer

SeenThat

SeenThat
Tel Aviv, Israel