La Paz Journals

Mercado Rodriguez

Best of IgoUgo

A travel journal to La Paz by SeenThat

Mercado Rodriguez Photo, La Paz, Bolivia More Photos
Quote: On karachi, wallake, pesje, llajta and other important topics.

Mercado Rodriguez

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Attraction | "Andean Heart"

Mercado Rodriguez Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
The sight is unavoidable. La Paz is literally one large street market. A colorful awayo cloth, or even a sheet of plastic would be put on the sidewalk; some good would be arranged in properly sized servings and offered to the public. A successful enterprise is created. Potatoes or chuño, peaches or pakai, everything goes. Busy shoppers must be kept content, thus simple snacks must be supplied. This journal is dedicated to typical snacks that can be found at the Mercado Rodriguez, one of the main markets in town. Mercado Rodriguez is the biggest food market in downtown La Paz, especially during the weekends. At first sight, their role may be unclear. Bulky women – wide skirts double their w...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 12, 2010

Mercado Rodriguez
Rodriguez Street
La Paz, Bolivia

Llajua

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Story/Tip

Mercado Rodriguez Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Turnovers are popular in South America. "Empanadas" exist in a wide variety of shapes and can contain many types of fillings; even different names exist for them. In Bolivia they are probably the widest spread snack, being consumed at all times of the day. That is with the clear exception of the unusual "llaucha" (yaoo-cha), which is consumed exclusively during the mornings. These are large turnovers covered with colorful red aji (a non-spicy type of chili) and filled with water-diluted salty white cheese and cornflour. The name is derived from the Aymara "llawsa," which means "water diluted." Moreover, its original version – and the only one worth of trying – served in only one spot in to...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on February 5, 2011

Pesje

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Restaurant | "On Andean Pseudo-Cereals"

Pesje Stall Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
So, what to have for breakfast? Don’t they have any proper cereals here? Actually, they do. Quinoa is used here mainly for the preparation of an awesome dish eaten during the mornings. Finding it is not easy, but the needed walk would for certain prepare the appetite. At 3.5 BOB (as of mid 2010, less than half American dollar) is probably the best bargain in town (world?).QuinoaQuinoa is a grain-like crop, defined as a pseudo-cereal; it is closely related to species such as beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Growing up to 4000 meters, it is an ideal crop for the high valleys surrounding the Andean High Plateau. Accordingly, it enjoyed a sacred status among the Incas. The n...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 12, 2010

Wallake

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Restaurant | "From Karachi to Wallake"

Wallake Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
This is one of the most popular breakfasts in the Titicaca Lake area of the Andean High Plateau. Being a fish soup, it may be considered an inappropriate breakfast by most foreigners; however, it is served hot and thus it is a much recommended option for the cold local mornings. At 5 BOB (roughly 70 American cents), they make an accessible and interesting meal.As with the pesje described in this journal, this is not a take away dish, thus the stalls can be recognized by the very low benches next to them. All of the ingredients here are hot and kept under cloths; thus, unlike the pesje, not even one of the dish ingredients would be seen by the approaching customer. However, due to the diffe...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 12, 2010

Sandwich de Lechon

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Restaurant | "On Trichinae and South-Americanism "

Sandwich de Lechon Photo, La Paz, Bolivia
Quote:
Within this journal this entry may seem an exception, after all it’s difficult to define a pork sandwich as local food in Bolivia. Yet, the cheese in the very original llajta is also a foreign dish adapted beyond recognition to local conditions. The same holds for the sandwich the lechon.On Trichinae and South-AmericanismPork meat – as llama one – may contain trichinae, a dangerous parasite that may cause serious health problems. Pigs contract it mainly while eating trash. Unluckily, most pigs in the Altiplano grow in private homes – sometimes even in city houses – and eat trash. Most restaurants serving pork have signs saying "cerdo de cabaña" (hut grown pig), insinuati...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 12, 2010

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SeenThat

SeenThat
Tel Aviv, Israel