Seville Journals

Seville - More Attractions

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An April 2007 trip to Seville by LenR

Churches come in all styles Photo, Seville, Spain More Photos
Quote: The city has many attractions and visitors should not be content to just see the big three – the Real Alcazar, the cathedral and Santa Cruz. This journal explores some of the other places and aspects of this city that make it memorable.

Getting Around

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Waiting Photo, Seville, Spain
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During your Seville visit, you will find that travelling from your hotel to the numerous activities and attractions in the city will be fairly easy. Seville's city layout is quite easy to understand. The town centre lies within the boundaries of the old Arab walls on the east bank of the Guadalquivir River and this is where you find most of the city’s attractions. These walls, which are visible in parts, enclose an area where it is difficult to drive a car. Streets are mostly still as narrow as in the Middle Ages, so buses generally don’t enter this area. The most practical way to get around here is to walk, enjoy the hustle and bustle, and when you feel tired just hail one of the many cheap taxis. ...Read More

Gardens

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Minute street garden Photo, Seville, Spain
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Seville can really boast about its wide variety of parks, both private and public. The city has some of the most beautiful city parks in Europe, including the Park of Maria Luisa, as well as numerous plazas and open spaces where you can happily people watch for hours. For a leisurely stroll, it's hard to beat the Paseo de Colon on the banks of the Guadalquivir River which stretches from the bridge leading to the interesting area of Triana to the historic Toro de Oro.The oldest garden remaining in Seville is the Patio de Los Naranjos (Orange Tree Patio). It was once part of the old mosque, where the worshippers washed their hands and feet in the fountains before prayer. The patio is now par...Read More

Alameda de Hercules

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Entrance Photo, Seville, Spain
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In the 16th century, a former branch of the Guadalquivir River was dried, and on its grounds the tree-lined Alameda Promenade was built. This vast open space near the center of Seville, is surrounded by Alamo trees, that give the place part of its name – Alameda.Two marble columns were placed at the entrance in 1574. These came from a nearby Roman temple of the 2nd century. These are the oldest monuments in Seville. Since 1754 the columns in the Alameda de Hercules carry the statues of Julius Cesar and Hercules, who, according to legend, are the two founding fathers of Seville. Seville was supposedly founded by Hercules and its origins are linked with the Tartessian civilisation. It was ca...Read More

Macarena - City Walls and Parliament

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City walls Photo, Seville, Spain
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La Macarena is a popular neighborhood of Seville. The neighborhood is best known as being home to the Virgen de la Macarena whose wooden statue dates from the 16th century and can be found in the Basilica. We stayed in this area at the Hotel Melia Macarena.Besides the Basilica de la Macarena, there are a number of other points of interest in this traditional neighborhood. The largest surviving portion of the medieval city walls, built largely by the ruling Arabs prior to the city's reconquest in the 13th century, spans from the Basilica (Puerta de la Macarena) to the Puerta de Cordob. This impressive, well-preserved 400-metre section in Macarena, is near the Andalucian parliament building....Read More

Churches

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Churches come in all styles Photo, Seville, Spain
Quote:
One of the great sightseeing highlights in Seville is the lovely cathedral (see my Seville Sightseeing journal) but there are many other churches and religious buildings just crying out for a piece of your time. Seville's parish churches display a fascinating variety of architectural styles. Several are converted mosques with belfries built over their minarets, while others range through Mudejar and Gothic (sometimes in combination), to Renaissance and Baroque.Although our time was limited (when is it not?) we took the opportunity to see the following and we were not disappointed that we did.Iglesia del Salvador - Plaza del Salvador, Seville, 41002 In the historic centre of Seville, ...Read More