Hong Kong Journals

Lost in Hong Kong

Best of IgoUgo

A September 2004 trip to Hong Kong by onesundaymorning

Yaumatei Photo, Hong Kong, China More Photos
Quote: Two days in Hong Kong isn't enough to experience what this country has to offer.

Lost in Hong Kong

Best Of IgoUgo

Overview

Buildings Photo, Hong Kong, China
Quote:
If China is the yin then Hong Kong is the yang. Although in name they are now the same country they couldn’t be more worlds apart. Skyscrapers line the skyline of main island of Hong Kong, businessmen run from building to building, and no one followed me through the streets begging for money. Don’t be fooled by outward appearances. Residents of Hong Kong are deeply influenced by Confucius, live by the way of Fung Shui, will pay up to ,000 USD for a license plate with a lucky number on it, and a short boat ride out of Kawloon is the world’s largest outside sitting Buddha and Disneyland. Arriving in Kawloon from Beijing I was taken back. How could this chain of 236 islands, nothing more then a dot...Read More

Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "Kowloon Island"

Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories Photo, Hong Kong, China
Quote:
Corrupted from the original name gau lungmeaning nine dragons, Kowloon was named for the peaks of the land that was said by emperor Di Ping to each hold a dragon. Although Chinese traditions remain strong the fact that Hong Kong was once a British colony still remains evident. Tsim Sha Tsui stands as the most popular tourist shopping area located along the waterfront. The glitz and glam of the area make it feel more like Vegas then China, but the views from the waterfront are amazing. My ship was docked at the Ocean Terminal were we got to disembarked the ship and walk into a mall that sold designer clothing. One local told me that the view I get from my porthole people pay $500 a night for at ...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on November 17, 2007

Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories

Hong Kong

Yaumatei

Attraction | "Yau Ma Tei"

Yaumatei Photo, Hong Kong, China
Quote:
Straying away from the posh shops that line the waterfront and Nathan Road, Yau Ma Tei presents another side of Hong Kong. Although the waterfront might have the best shopping and all of the great tourist attractions Yau Ma Tei is where all of the action happens. From crowed streets and markets to cheap motels and the cities red-light district this isn’t the place most tourists would venture to unless to shop at the famous Temple Street Night Market. Sidewalks packed for almost a mile with vendors and shoppers pushing there way from stall to stall line Temple Street. The bazaar like market sets up around 5pm and runs until midnight the activity really doesn’t pick up until 8pm and dies arouind10pm. Th...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on November 17, 2007

Yaumatei

Hong Kong
+852 2807 6543 (HK T

Yaumatei

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "Tian Tan Buddha"

Yaumatei Photo, Hong Kong, China
Quote:
Arriving at Lantau is like stepping back in time; comparing the old China to the new Hong Kong. The villages at the pier where the Star Ferry docks are run down, but somehow they enhance the rugged beauty of the land. Nearby the docks is a bus station that takes passangers to the Po Lin Monastery. It’s not uncommon for the bus to be almost empty and include at least one monk. The bumpy ride takes about an hour (on bus 2 and 23), but is worth every minute. The views of the interior of the island are breathtaking, and just like a great novel it leaves anyone wanting to see more. The great attaction to the monestary is the seated outside Buddha, which is the largest of its type. The steps of the Bud...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on November 17, 2007

Yaumatei

Hong Kong
+852 2807 6543 (HK T

China or Not?

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
Hong Kong is a land trapped between two worlds, the east and the west. Originally a product of China later to be taken over by the British, and then given back to the PRC only to become a SAR (Special Administrative Region).My arrival in Hong Kong was perplexing at best. Prior to my arrival I spent several days traveling through Shanghai and Beijing. Each city very different in there own right, but distinctly Chinese. Even though there was a busting city the ideals of Communism still lingered and the remains of the third world still could be seen on the streets. On the bus ride to the airport my tour guide explained that since the handover of Hong Kong the two countries were now one. They use...Read More