Puerto Princesa Journals

Eating our way around Puerto Princesa

An October 2007 trip to Puerto Princesa by marseilles

The menu at Bonas. Photo, Puerto Princesa, Philippines More Photos
Quote: We came for the sights. We stayed for the flavors.

Vietville Restaurant

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Restaurant

Quote:
A few decades ago, Puerto Princesa began opening its arms to refugees fleeing trouble-ridden Vietnam. The Vietnamese would arrive on the coasts of Palawan by boat, bringing with them their dreams for a better life ... as well as their delicious cuisine!"Vietville" is what locals have come to call the Vietnamese Village, a village put up by a Catholic charity in the 1990s to house the Vietnamese refugees. In recent years, most of the Vietnamese residents have moved on--either to other parts of the Philippines, back to Vietnam, or to the United States where some of them have been granted asylum--but the structures in their village and their influence on Puerto Princesa's cuisine remains....Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on October 23, 2007

Bona's-Lan's Chaolong House and Restaurant

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Restaurant

The menu at Bona's. Photo, Puerto Princesa, Philippines
Quote:
After eating some fantastic beef stew at Vietville Restaurant for our afternoon snack, we hadn't had enough of Palawan's Vietnamese cuisine. That same evening, we decided to whet our craving for more Vietnamese food. We asked Ryan, our friendly hotel receptionist, for a recommended Vietnamese eatery, and he suggest we try Bona's.In Vietnam, "Chao Long" refers to a breakfast dish of pork innards in a kind of rice porridge, but it seems that here, all kinds of Vietnamese stews are collectively called "chao long." (So when looking for a Vietnamese eatery, just ask a tricycle driver where you can eat "chao long.") Vietnamese stews are so popular here, that it is almost like their street fo...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on October 23, 2007