Delhi Journals

Historic Delhi Part 5: Way Off The Beaten Path

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A November 2006 trip to Delhi by phileasfogg

Bade Khan ka Gumbad Photo, Delhi, India More Photos
Quote: The Qutub Minar, Humayun's Tomb, Jama Masjid - the top historic monuments in Delhi. But India's capital has plenty that's little known but worth seeing!

Chor Minar/Tower of Thieves

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Attraction | "Chor Minar"

Chor Minar/Tower of Thieves Photo, New Delhi, India
Quote:
Although it’s fairly small and little known, the Chor Minar (literally, the 'Thieves’ Tower’) is worth a quick visit – simply because it’s got a history that’s so fascinatingly gruesome. If you’ve got a vivid imagination, this place, disarmingly pretty, can give you a hefty dose of gooseflesh. The Chor Minar sits in the heart of one of South Delhi’s poshest neighbourhoods, Hauz Khas (named for an interesting and very large medieval hauz, or watertank, with the tomb of a Sultan – Ferozeshah Tughlaq – and a madarsa, a school of higher education, beside it). Although Hauz Khas itself is fairly well known, few people know of Chor Minar. We arrived on a warm summer morni...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 10, 2007

Chor Minar/Tower of Thieves
Aurobindo Marg, Hauz Khas Enclave
New Delhi, India 110016

Bade Khan ka Gumbad Photo, Delhi, India
Quote:
About a ten-minute walk from South Extension-1 market lies a park with neat lawns and shady trees, and three unidentified tombs. One of these- a small, dilapidated one that seems to have been neglected even by the Archaeological Survey of India (the ASI)- stands in a distant corner and doesn’t really merit a visit. This is Bhure Khan ka Gumbad; the other two tombs, the main ones that stand tall and splendid, are the ones we went to see: Chhote Khan ka Gumbad and Bade Khan ka Gumbad. 'Bade Khan’ (literally, the 'large’ or 'great’ khan) seems to be a very arbitrary name, given possibly because this particular tomb is larger than the other one. 'Chhote Khan’, similarly, means the 'lesser’ or 'mi...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 10, 2007

Begumpuri Masjid

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Attraction

Begumpuri Masjid Photo, Delhi, India
Quote:
After the impressive Jama Masjid, the Begumpuri Masjid is probably Delhi’s largest mosque – but very few people know about it. And to most who live near it, this huge building, with its forbidding walls and multiple black domes, looks more a fortress than a house of worship. There are different theories about who built the Begumpuri Masjid. The most popular contender is Ferozeshah Tughlaq’s minister, Khan-e-Jahan Junaan Shah Telangani (an enthusiastic builder of mosques). However, at the time Telangani was building all his mosques, this area – which abuts Bijai Mandal, the palace of Mohammad bin Tughlaq – was already pretty deserted. Another theory is that Mohammad bin Tughlaq, or one of hi...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 10, 2007

Begumpuri Masjid
Malviya Nagar (near Sarvpriya Vihar)
Delhi

Bijai Mandal

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Attraction

Bijai Mandal  Photo, Delhi, India
Quote:
Delhi’s many rulers, over the centuries, seem to have been possessed with the urge to build a new city – or at least a settlement and palace – of their own, as soon as they came to power. And that didn’t just mean when one dynasty gave way to another, but even when nephew succeeded uncle or son succeeded father. Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq constructed the massive Tughlaqabad Fort, and as soon as he was dead, his nephew Mohammad bin Tughlaq decided to do some ...Read More

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Bijai Mandal
Opposite Sarvpriya Vihar Club
Delhi

Jahaz Mahal and the Hauz-e-Shamsi

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Attraction

Jahaz Mahal and the Hauz-e-Shamsi Photo, Delhi, India
Quote:
Delhi’s winter is marked by a unique festival known as the Phoolwaalon ki Sair or Sair-e-Gulfaroshaan ('The Fair of the Flowersellers’). The Sair-e-Gulfaroshaan dates back to 1812, when the mother of an exiled prince vowed that she would offer flowers at the tomb of the saint Qutubuddin Bakhtiar Kaki if her son’s exile was revoked. The votive procession and offering that followed the prince’s return to Delhi is today a winter equivalent of the Republic Day parade: pageantry, regional dances, colourful fans crafted from flowers, and more. And all of it is held at the 15th century palace known as Jahaaz Mahal. Less than a ten--minute walk from Qutubuddin Bakhtiar Kaki’s tomb, Jahaaz Mahal – t...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 10, 2007

Jahaz Mahal and the Hauz-e-Shamsi
Near Qutubuddin Bakhtiar Kaki’s Dargah, Mehrauli
Delhi

Tomb of Darya Khan Lohani

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Attraction

Tomb of Darya Khan Lohani Photo, Delhi, India
Quote:
I’ve lived in Delhi for more than twenty years now, and despite the fact that I’m very keen on history, I have to admit I’d never even heard of the Tomb of Darya Khan Lohani. A friend dragged Tarun and I along one hot Saturday morning, however- and I was shown one of the most unusual tombs in Delhi. Most medieval tombs are covered tombs- covered, that is, with a dome or at least some form of roof. Invariably, there’s plenty of other decoration, in the way of ornately carved lattices, walls, fine doorways, arches, and the like. In later Mughal tombs like that of Humayun, the tomb is particularly impressive: it sprawls atop a plinth, in the midst of a garden, surrounded by other tombs,...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 10, 2007

Tomb of Darya Khan Lohani
Behind South Market, Kidwai Nagar (east)
Delhi