Louisville Journals

Whisky Making - The Kentucky Way!

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A May 2007 trip to Louisville by MilwVon

David & Von Photo, More Photos
Quote: We took a day to tour several of the bourbon/whisky distilleries around Louisville on our return drive home from Williamsburg, VA.

Whisky Making - The Kentucky Way!

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Overview

David Ready to Dip Photo,
Quote:
Our visit to Louisville and the area of Kentucky known for American Bourbon Whisky was much by chance on our return from our road trip to Williamsburg, Virginia. Louisville offered a nice halfway stop between Iowa and our destination and during that stop we realized that stopping on our return would allow for exploration of the distilleries in the area. It also convenient since we wanted to stop in and visit David's Mom in Indianapolis, which would give us the better part of a day to tour a few of the Louisville area bourbon makers.The "whisky trail" generally runs along the Bluegrass Parkway that is south of Louisville and runs northeast up near Lexington. For our sightseeing tour we visi...Read More

Marker's Mark Distillery - Loretto, KY

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Story/Tip

Entering Marker's Mark Stillhouse Photo,
Quote:
Marker’s Mark is proud of their old fashioned hand-made whisky distillery operation, with their legacy beginning as a family business in 1840 in Samuels Depot, KY. Today the seventh generation member of the Samuels family continues with the tradition, even if today’s product is different than what was produced by the early family recipe. Marker’s Mark as we know it today really came into existence, however, in 1958 when the new brand name and recipe was launched. Bill Samuels, Sr. wanted to change the recipe to make a smoother sipping whisky. He tinkered with the grain mixture, ultimately choosing to replace the rye with locally grown winter wheat. The result indeed met with his desired outcome, creat...Read More
David & Von Photo,
Quote:
The Bourbon Heritage Center is the centerpiece of the Heaven Hill Distilleries located approximately 45 minutes from Louisville. Today Heaven Hill Distilleries is the largest private conglomerate in the business of liquor. It is here that visitors and bourbon aficionados can learn about the distilling process used to produce such brand names as Evan Williams, Elijah Craig, and Old Fitzgerald among several others. This tourist attraction opened in 2004 and is largely focused on telling the history of the brand and the retail selling of unique branded items of their product line. The visitor center has more of an exhibit and museum feel to it, with lots of antiques, photographs, and picture...Read More

Jim Beam Outpost – Clermont, KY

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Story/Tip

Rolling Out the Barrels Photo,
Quote:
Jim Beam Bourbon has its roots in Kentucky, dating back to the 18th century when a farmer by the name of Jacob Beam distilled whisky for his own personal use. By 1795 he was selling his product to locals and establishing the Beam name synonymous with Kentucky Bourbon whisky. Today the Jim Beam Outpost provides visitors the opportunity to learn more about the distilling, Jim Beam the company and the legacy created by over 200 years with the same recipe and process as that first barrel of “Old Jake Beam Sour Mash” sold in 1795!The Jim Beam Outpost is your starting and finishing point for your visit to learn about Jim Beam. We were immediately greeted with a friendly lady offering us homemade cho...Read More

How They Make American Bourbon Whisky

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Story/Tip

Double Still Distillation Photo,
Quote:
Rather than to fill up three reviews with the details of the full process, I thought it best to tackle that as a separate topic. So to that end, I offer. . . How they make American bourbon whisky.In order to be called bourbon whisky in America, the law requires that a grain mixture using at least 51% of corn have to be used. Additionally, the liquid must come out of the evaporation process at least 160 proof and must be stored for a minimum of two years in new char oak barrels and that there would be no additives to give the product color or flavor. While clear “white dog” is the original alcohol product that comes out of the distillation process, the aging process (typically four to...Read More