Cochabamba Journals

Deep Down in the Valleys: Cochabamba

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A February 2007 trip to Cochabamba by SeenThat

Cristo de la Concordia Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia More Photos
Quote: Few cities in the world are higher than Cochabamba. Yet, for most Bolivians, the town is deep down in the valleys.

Apart Hotel Regina

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Hotel

Apart Hotel Regina Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Quote:
I find it hard to describe hotels, or at least to do so in an attractive way. The more hotels I visit – in different cities, countries and continents – the hardest it becomes to differentiate among them. A room with some furniture and washing facilities can summarize most of them. Of course, the details make the difference; sometimes the equipment is better, others it is worse. But few hotels manage to create a lasting memory; I found one of them in Cochabamba.I had arrived there as an invitee of a local institution; being the country a poor one, I was placed in a tree stars hotel. Thanking my hosts, I approached the Regina Hotel – where a room was supposed to be waiting for me – and found...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on March 22, 2007

Apart Hotel Regina
Calle España No. 356 Entre Reza y La Paz
Cochabamba
+591 4 423 4216

Cristo de la Concordia

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Attraction

Cristo de la Concordia Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Quote:
Embracing humanity from above, the Cristo de la Concordia in Cochabamba is the highest and tallest Christ statue in South America. Many Evangelical Christians find the very concept of such a statue offending; however, despite being one of them, I disagree. A statue erected as a symbol of peace and concord among humans – not within a temple – and in clear sight for everyone to see and get the message must be praised. Welcoming, outstretched arms are too rare in our world to be ignored.A message of love for Quechuas and Aymaras, Guaranis and Gringos alike, this specific site is worth a visit also due to the awesome views of the city and the mountains – the Altiplano in fact – just next to it...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on March 22, 2007

Cristo de la Concordia
Heroinas Avenue
Cochabamba, Bolivia

Salteñas Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Quote:
Wherever I stopped in South America, I could be confident to find one stable thing. More stable than governments, cultures and languages were the "empanadas," a turnover-like pastry that is consumed as a snack at all hours. Well, almost stable. The slight variations accounted for different ingredients and tastes; in some places it was hot and spicy while in others, chillies were considered a barbarian taste.There are two methods of preparation, in the oven and fried. In Argentina the first are called "al horno" and the second are "fritas." The filling is usually of beef or h...Read More
Crossing the Bridge Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Quote:
Roughly circular, at first sight Bolivia looks as an easy country to plan a trip on it. The second sight reveals a more complex reality. A big part of the country is occupied by the Altiplano – the Andean Plateau –, which rises up to four kilometers above the sea level. The oriental part of the country is within the Amazonian Basin and is partly flooded during January and February. The third important zone is what the locals call the Valleys – the steep slopes connecting the Altiplano with the Amazonian Basin. Such a complex environment is an invitation for troubles.Sadly, there are no go...Read More

Deep Down in the Valleys

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Story/Tip

Family Photo, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Quote:
The fourth biggest city in Bolivia (with roughly half a million inhabitants) Cochabamba shares the basic design of Bolivian cities: a tiny downtown surrounded by endless shantytowns. However, its peculiarities make it well worth a visit: the main city in the Bolivian Valleys has the best climate and food in the country. Rich in extremes, Bolivia has few mild areas; in Cochabamba the proximity to the equator and the Amazonian Basin is balanced by the height since the city is well above the 2500m above the sea level. It is higher even than Santa Fe in New Mexico. Yet, most Bolivians refer to it as bein...Read More