Greece Journals

Driving the Peloponnese

A May 1999 trip to Greece by skeptic

View from the Bleacher Seats Photo, Greece, Europe More Photos
Quote: History and legend abound here. The best way to see the Greek Peloponnese Peninsula is to drive it. Now the bad news. You can’t do it in a week. We found it convenient to anchor at the Porto Hydra Royal Club and make daily drives out. Here are my tips.
Porto Hydra Royal Club Photo, Peloponnese, Greece
Quote:
Trading a time share week made our stay in the Peloponnese absolutely painless. Getting there from the Athens airport was a bit problematic, due entirely to our unfamiliarity with the region. The resort’s driving instructions were flawless.If it’s remote you want, Porto Hydra has it. You arrive there after a drive down the Peloponnese Peninsula past the mountain-top city of Kranidi and the seaside village of Ermioni. Follow the road through Ermioni as it narrows to a country lane and finally arrives at the resort. Signs posted along the highway all the way from Kranidi keep you on the correct route.Check in is painless, as always at RCI resorts. At Porto Hydra parking dur...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 31, 2008

Porto Hydra Royal Club
Plepi Ermionis, Ermionis
Peloponnese
27540-41270

Ancient Corinth

Story/Tip

The Temple of Apollo Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
The entrance to the Peloponnese Peninsula is the modern city of Corinth. Nearby is the ancient city of the same name.
No visit to the Peloponnese is complete without a tour of the ruins. From Athens drive to Corinth. Just past the bridge over the Corinth Canal is the city and signs pointing to the archaeological site.
Visitors of the park can walk the streets of the this former imperial city and pose beside the great stone columns of the Temple of Apollo that have become icons of ancient Greece. The on-site museum presents a treasure of artifacts recounting the critical history of the city and the region.

Fantastic Canal

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Fantastic Passage Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
The ancient Greeks were smart people, and it did not take them long to notice and interesting fact. The Peloponnese Peninsula is connected to the mainland, and the rest of Greece, by a neck of land only a short walk wide. If they could cut through this neck, they figured, they could shave days of sailing from an Athens to Italy voyage.The problem was that this narrow neck represented a stone wall 52 meters tall. Sawing it through was beyond the technology of these ancients, but the Roman emperor Nero made the first serious attempt, even swinging the first pick into the soil. Nero died shortly thereafter, and the project was abandoned. The Greeks, themselves, finally finished the proje...Read More

Driving There

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

On the Road from Kranidi Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
This is about driving in Greece, and all the good advice is to avoid driving in Greece. Here is more of the same.Pick up your rent car at the airport in Athens and head for the Peloponnese. Good luck.The map from the rental company is not going to help you get out of Athens unless you already know the way. You are now south of the city, and you want to go into the city so you can take the highway west toward Corinth. That’s a big mistake.First is the Athens traffic. Drivers here consider those lane markings a nuisance and ignore them as much as possible. It’s the Indianapolis 500, and everybody except you knows where they are going.First bit of advice. You will notice a...Read More

The Jewel that is Galaxidi

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Story/Tip

Galaxidi by the Gulf of Corinth Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
All right, Galaxidi is not in the Peloponnese, but this is no time to be picky. Follow E65 along the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth, and you will eventually see the jewel that is Galaxidi next to the water’s edge below you. Head on down to explore and spend the night if you wish.History here goes back 3400 years, but the quaint village you see before you cannot be very old. In recent times World War 2 and the Greek revolution have seen this place burned to the ground. How it got its name (sour milk) is anybody’s guess.For me, as always, the waterfront is the place for photos. Again, colorful boats and nautical gear and a string of inviting restaurants along the quay make for a pho...Read More
Taverna Dining in Nafplion Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
In a previous life it was the capital of Greece, now it’s a sleepy port city. Well, not that sleepy. Compared to nearby Porto Heli, Nafplion is a hive of activity, with freight and fishing vessels chugging in and out daily. Greek Navy activity is apparent, as well.The port is ideal for people like me, who want to wander around with a camera and a few lenses. Tree-lined avenues break out onto the sun-lit quay where multihued boats and fishing nets present a cascade of color. Along the narrow streets and alleyways a feast awaits as hosts set up their dining tables beneath the trees. What is most unfortunate is that you can eat only so many times a day.Park on the street near the waterf...Read More

Porto Heli and Sun

Story/Tip

Porto Heli Dock Side Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
Porto Heli comes out as "bay of the eels." "Heli" translates to "eels," not "sun," but you can make believe. This is the place for sun and fun.Although the archaeological site of ancient Halieis is nearby, Porto Heli doesn’t have anything of interest besides the place itself. For me, that is the waterfront along the bay, where colorful boats are moored, sleek motorcycles line the sidewalk, and neat shops and enticing eateries welcome visitors.To be sure, water sport facilities are available. Divers may want to check out Porto Heli Scuba Club (http://www.greekdiving.com/). Skiing, sailing, wind surfing are listed by Porto Heli Water Sports (http://www.portoheliwatersports.com/).We...Read More
View from the Bleacher Seats Photo, Greece, Europe
Quote:
This was a must see, especially since was such a short drive from the Porto Hydra time share. The theater survived well the 2300 years since its construction, and renovation in modern times has restored it to use.There 34 rows of limestone benches lining the semi-circular bowl in the original Greek design. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidaurus), the Romans added the extra 21 rows above that. Climbing the tiers and sitting on a stone bench allows the visitor to connect with those people from long ago. Sit where an ancient Greek or Roman did and listen as a tour guide several stories below you talks in a normal voice. Imagine being here on a cool summer evening and wa...Read More