Flagstaff Journals

Gems of Northern Arizona

Best of IgoUgo

A travel journal to Flagstaff by reef2020

Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site Photo, Flagstaff, Arizona More Photos
Quote: For most people, the words "Northern Arizona" scream "Grand Canyon." While the "Big Ditch" is something everyone should see, there are many smaller National Park areas in the northern part of the state that are nearly as fascinating, but lack the crowds.

Gems of Northern Arizona

Overview

Quote:
Wupatki, Sunset Crater Volcano and Walnut Canyon National Monuments are all easy drives outside Flagstaff. A little farther afield, to the north and east, are Petrified Forest National Park, Hubbel Trading Post National Historic Site, Canyon de Chelly and Navajo National Monuments, and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.Quick Tips: Use Flagstaff as a base for a few days, then move out to Holbrook for a night, and up through Ganado to Chinle for a night or two, and on through Kayenta to Page, through to Grand Canyon and back to Flagstaff. This trip can easily take a week to enjoy, but you'll probably want more time.Best Way To Get Around: Definitely a self-drive trip, preferably in ...Read More
Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site Photo, Flagstaff, Arizona
Quote:
In 1878, John Lorenzo Hubbell opened a trading post near Ganado. Back then, trading posts were THE social and economic centers for the Navajo. They came here to trade goods and trade stories. Hubbell was the most respected trader in the nation. People would come long distances to deal with Hubbell, knowing he would give them a fair deal. The rugs, jewelry, pottery, baskets and other works of art, as well as wool and livestock, were brought here to swap for groceries, tools, tobacco, and a myriad of other items. Trading, due to the social context, was a long, slow process. Nobody was in a great rush then, and not much has changed today. Now comes the fun part! Remember, this not only WAS a trading ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 7, 2001

Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site
State Route 264
Ganado, Arizona 86505
+1 928 755 3475

Walnut Canyon National Monument

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Story/Tip

Walnut Canyon National Monument: Cliff Dwelling Photo, Flagstaff, Arizona
Quote:
Just 10 miles east of Flagstaff, off Interstate 40, lies one of my favorite little National Park Service areas: Walnut Canyon National Monument. Vastly smaller and considerably less well-known than Grand Canyon, Walnut is more on a comprehensible, human scale. Eight hundred years ago, the canyon was home to hundreds of Sinagua Indians. For me, the most striking aspect of Walnut Canyon is actually how little evidence of people you initially see when you peer down into the canyon from the park's great little visitor center. Spend more than a few moments staring though, and you'll be equally surprised at HOW MUCH evidence there is. Almost like magic, little stone rooms appear: first one, then ...Read More

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

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Story/Tip

Canyon de Chelly National Monument: Cash & Hagen Photo, Flagstaff, Arizona
Quote:
Canyons and cliff dwellings are a dime-a-dozen in the Four Corners Region. So what makes Canyon de Chelly (pronounced de-shay) any different? Not only was the canyon a home to people 2000 years ago, it is still the home of their descendants today. The canyon has a record of 20 centuries of nearly continuous habitation. Unlike many other canyon/cliff dwelling combos in the area, which take on a kind of museum-like quality, look to the bottom of de Chelly and you'll see the Dineh (Navajo) people carrying out their daily lives on the broad, flat areas down below: plowing corn fields, tending sheep and orchards, weaving baskets and rugs, and driving pickup trucks and l...Read More

Petrified Forest National Park

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Story/Tip

Petroglyphs Photo, Flagstaff, Arizona
Quote:
When I was a little boy, back in 1972, I remember being very excited when Mom and Dad told me we were going to see the Petrified Forest, a place where the trees had turned to stone. I, like many visitors to this gem of a park in Eastern Arizona, fully expected to see the stone trees standing up, and I guess I was a bit disappointed when I realized that they had all fallen down, and the landscape was more "desert-ish" than "forest-y." I'd be lying if I said I wasn't similarly disappointed in the colors of the Painted Desert. My seven-year-old brain thought "well, if you're going to paint it, you could at least use brighter colors!" Subsequent visits as an adult, though, gave me a real appreciatio...Read More