Bucharest Journals

Weekend in Bucharest

A travel journal to Bucharest by 3mttours

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Quote: Mentioned the first time in the middle of the 15th century during the reign of Vlad Ţepeş, better known as Dracula, Bucharest has seen a big increase in size and reputation until the 20th century, thus becoming a regional Capital and a cosmopolitan city and a sharp decline during communism.

Hotel Opera

Hotel | "Hotel Opra"

Quote:
If you are looking for a hotel that feels just like home, Hotel Opera is the place. Reopened in December 2002, Hotel Opera is perfectly placed in a central cultural and business area of Bucharest in a really quiet corner close to the Cişmigiu Garden.Paintings depict the city during the previous century, and silver objects and porcelain add a distinctive note to each room. Warm colours and the quality of personalized services transform it in a unique executive business hotel that combines the glamour of the beginning of the 20th century with today’s comfort standards.The rooms offer modern comfort in a traditional manner perfectly suited both for business and for leisure. On the sevent...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Hotel Opera
Str. Brezoianu nr. 37, sector 1
Bucharest, Romania
+40 (21) 312 48 55

Manuc’s Inn

Restaurant

Manuc’s Inn Photo, Bucharest, Romania
Quote:
Manuc Mirzaian is one of the most interesting and controversial characters of Romanian history. Born in 1769 in Rusciuk (today in Bulgaria), he found his way with the Turkish officials, receiving the Moldovian throne in 1808.The important inheritance that he received after the death of his father helped him greatly. He bought some land near the Old Princiary Court, which was auctioned at the beginning of the 19th century, and built an inn between 1806 and 1808. The inn was built on three levels, including 15 vaulted cellars, several shops, deposits, dormitories for servants, kitchens, and dormitories and office rooms. The inner court housed a cafe.After his protector, the great vizier...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Manuc’s Inn
62 – 64 Franceza Street
Bucharest, Romania
+40 21 3131415

Restaurant & Hotel Capa

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Restaurant | "Restaurant & Hotel Capşa"

Restaurant & Hotel Capa Photo, Bucharest, Romania
Quote:
Built in the 1880s as a posh restaurant and hotel, the Restaurant Capşa has become internationally reputed. Shortly after Romania’s entry into World War I, half of the country was under occupation. Well, Capşa became an important meeting club of the occupation army, a sort of club of the superiors of the said army.Stories of the old tell how a general of the occupation army, a regular guest of the restaurant, having his coffee after lunch, spits on the floor to his right. The waiter, not saying a thing, brings a silvery bowl and puts it on the table for his guest’s convenience, on the side where he had previously spit. After a while, the guest, the general, spits again, now on his left. The ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Restaurant & Hotel Capa
Calea Victoriei
Bucharest, Romania

Church of the Old Princiary Court

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Attraction | "The Church of the Old Princiary Court"

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Quote:
It is seemingly the oldest intact building in Bucharest--from the Old Court only ruins can be seen. Built from 1558 to 1559 by Prince Mircea Ciobanul on the place of an older one (14th century), it resembles the church of the Monastery of Cozia on the Olt Valley, which was at the time Princiary Necropolis. It was finished, however, by his son, successor to the Valahian throne, Petru the Younger. It was the latter who brought some minor changes and finally painted it.  As the Church of the Princiary Court, it had a place of ointment of the ruling princes. This procession included the sacrificing of two young ox at the entrance in the church. Following tradition, the ruling prince, when going thr...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Church of the Old Princiary Court
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

St. George's Churches of Bucharest

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Attraction

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member
Quote:
The old St. George’s Church was raised in 1562 on the location of a smaller wooden church by the Minister of the Interiors Nedelco Bălăceanu, counsellor to the ruling princes Mircea Ciobanul, Petru the Younger, Alexandru II Mircea, and Mihnea Vodă. Thirteen years later it was rebuilt by Minister of Finances Nedelcu-Mitrea.  Its importance in Romanian history is great. Especially if we consider that it was, for 30 years, the Valahian Mitropoly during the 15th and the 16th century. Moreover, the church had an important role in the history of the teaching in Bucharest. Brâncoveanu had made a School of Writing and Romanian language, beginning in 1687.  Destroyed by Sinan-Pasha in 1595, when ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

St. George's Churches of Bucharest
Throughout Bucharest
Bucharest, Romania

Romanian Patriarchy

Attraction | "The Romanian Patriarchy"

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member
Quote:
The church was built in 1656 by the ruling prince Constantin Şerban the Snub-Nosed and Lady Bălaşa on the foundations of a wooden hermitage, but it was finished by Mihail Radu Mihnea III. It has its festivity on the day of the Saint Emperors Constantin and Helen. It was the same period the Mitropoly’s Palace was raised, a palace that has been widened during the 17th century. In 1688 it took over the title of the Valahian Mitropolitan Seat from the Old St. George’s Church. In 1886 the church was repainted by Gh. Tattarescu. From its original painting remains only the icon of its festivity, the icon of the Saint Emperors Constantin and Helen. In 1744, Russian General Saltâkov brought from ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Romanian Patriarchy
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

Princiary School at St. Sava

Attraction | "The Princiary School at St. Sava"

Quote:
In 1679, the Ruling Prince Şerban Cantacuzino started a princiary school at the Monastery of St. Sava, a school that soon became the first renowned Romanian school.  In 1695, Constantin Brâncoveanu developed a high school that became known as the Romanian Academy. Beginning with the 18th century onwards, the school was lead by the Patriarchy of Jerusalem. It is in this period it got a well-defined status through the “The Order of the Teachers of St. Sava of Bucharest,” an order that was put together by the Patriarch of Jerusalem.  At first, Greek was the teaching language, but in 1818, G. Lazăr opened another school at the Monastery of St. Sava, the teaching language in Romanian. Yet, un...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Princiary School at St. Sava
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

Cotroceni Palace

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Attraction

Quote:
In 1679, the building of the Cotroceni Monastery began--the location was in middle in the thick forests to the west of the capital. The palace of the ruling princes, attached to the monastery, belonged to it, though the prince had the right to use it as a residence. Works ended around 1682, when the prince dedicated the monastery to the Holy Mount of Athos (Greece).  The Cotroceni Monastery was by far not the only one dedicated either to the Mount of Athos or to other Greek monasteries. That is, they actually belonged to the Greek monasteries, together with their entire possessions, which were substantial in most cases. In 1863, after the personal union of Moldova and Valahia through Alexandru ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Cotroceni Palace
Bulevardul Geniului, nr. 1
Bucharest, Romania

Calea Victoriei

Attraction | "Calea Victoriei - The History of a Road"

Quote:
We have been talking about now about Constantin Brâncoveanu, the Valahian ruler who managed to introduce a most particular architectural style in his country. It was he again who, in 1692, made a new road, “The Mogoşoaia Bridge.”  The new road started at the Brâncoveanu Palace at the Dâmboviţa River and led all the way through to the ruler’s possessions in Mogoşoaia (see article on Castles around Bucharest: Mogoşoaia Castle). At that time, on the main roads of the Capital, oak bridges were built, employing 25-30cm-thick and about 8m-long oak trunks that were laid across the road, with two oak foots, one on each side. Between the 2 feet, a ditch of bricks of 50 to 80cm was built, with cesspools ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Calea Victoriei
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

Stavropoleos Church

Attraction

Quote:
At the beginning of the 18th century, the Greek monk Ioanikie Stratnikeas of the Goura Monastery in the Greek Macedonia started a journey to collect funds for Greek churches. We need to consider that many Valahian (and Moldovan) churches and monasteries of the time were dedicated to Greek monasteries (being also of Orthodox faith), including important pieces of land and properties in the country.  While in Valahia, between 1722 and 1724, he built an inn, the Stavropoleos Inn, and next to it a chapel that had to become a church in 1724. Two years later, Stratnikeas becomes Mitropolite of Stavropoleos.  The church became famous because of its valuable carvings in stone and in wood, which m...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Stavropoleos Church
Central Buharest
Bucharest, Romania

Romanian Athenaeum

Attraction | "The Romanian Athenaeum"

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member
Quote:
At the 2005 George Enescu Festival, we attended the concert given by the Schubert Ensemble at the Romanian Athenaeum. Brilliant performers and the nicest concert hall of Bucharest is what we got.  The birth of the Romanian Athenaeum was around 1865, during the period of the unification of Moldova and Vallachia to become Romania. The idea started with three people: V. A. Urechia, Constantin Esarcu, and Nicolae Kretulescu.  It is first in 1886 that the scientific society receives its legal personality, a body holding conferences on different issues of the time. This is the moment when the Athenaeum is given, by law, a piece of land in Bucharest, on which it should build its office. Problem...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

Romanian Athenaeum
Calea Victoriei
Bucharest, Romania

University of Bucharest

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Attraction | "The University of Bucharest"

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Quote:
In 1891, at the 25th anniversary of his reign, Charles I of Romania donated the necessary money to build a university close to his royal residence. Some 4 years later, the institution was ready for inauguration.Among the objectives HM set for the university was building a library, which initially hosted 3,400 volumes, most of which were donated by His Majesty himself (this being the first university library); facilitating the study for undergraduate and for postgraduate degrees; providing bursaries for poor, though brilliant students; and also printing students’ works and PhD thesis. While in the beginning there was a pretty high control from the side of His Majesty, after gaining some exper...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 12, 2005

University of Bucharest
36-46, M. Kogălniceanu Bd
Bucharest, Romania
+40 21-307 73 00

House of The People

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Attraction | "The House of The People"

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member
Quote:
The planning of the House of the People, as it was called during Communist times, started in 1982, involving several hundred architects. Two years later, some 25% of the whole budget of the executive was invested in order to start the building of the grandiose palace. Needless to say, the economy of the country became worse each year, culminating with the revolution in 1989. To build the House of the People and the Research Institute nearby (intended for Elena Ceauşescu, the dictator’s wife) and the whole complex of ministries, institutes, and flats for the leaders of the country and for the members of the Communist Party, a whole part of the city was destroyed, just to build it all on the most s...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 13, 2005

House of The People
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

Museum of the Jews from Romania

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Attraction | "The Museum of the Jews in Romania (1)"

Quote:
January 21, 1941, a rebellion of the legionaries of Romania broke out, lasting for some 3 days. At that moment, a pogrom against the Jews was started. Soldiers were burned and citizens mistreated, and much more happened in the streets of and in the woods around Bucharest. The nightmare lasted for some 60 hours. Of the 236 people who died, 118 were Jews. The Jewish Museum in Bucharest has been organised in a synagogue as soon as 1978. It is located in the old Jewish quarter of the city, downtown in Bucharest. Here, some 60 years ago, this was the place where much of the commerce of the town took place. Now the area is enclosed by a circle of blocs of flats, built during Communist rule. It is hoped, ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 19, 2005

Museum of the Jews from Romania
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

Museum of the Jews from Romania

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Attraction | "The Museum of the Jews from Romania (2)"

Quote:
The fact is that the doctors at the princiary courts were Jews, especially in Moldova. Between the 15th and 18th centuries, there are plenty of documents attesting the presence of Jewish doctors at the courts of Stefan the Great, Vasile Lupu, and Nicolae Mavrocordat. Even in the army of Mihai Viteazu, who succeeded around 1600 to unite the Romanian principalities the first time after the Roman period, there were Jewish soldiers. Many cities have been made by Jews, especially in Moldova, where Jews were brought from other countries by the rulers or by the nobility to get the economy in a better state. Despite this, the Jews did not get any political rights in the Romanian principalities; even though...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 19, 2005

Museum of the Jews from Romania
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania

A Historic Overview

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Story/Tip

Travel Photo by IgoUgo member
Quote:
Bucharest was alternating with Curtea de Argeş (the first capital) and Târgovişte during the second half of the 16th century and the first half of the 17th century as the capital city of Valahia. The main residence of the ruling prince was directly dependent of his politics--a filo-Turkish approach (Bucharest was the option), or an intent of independence (Curtea de Argeş was, in this case, the option). In1632, a traveller through Bucharest wrote that it was a city "without any fortifications, laid in a region that is rich in grains and full of cattle of all sorts, of grapes and fruits; fish is abundant, the Danube being not far, at some 30 miles, and many lakes even closer to the city. This city ...Read More