Dublin Journals

Letting the Foam Settle in Dublin

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A September 2005 trip to Dublin by Mr. Wonka

Kilmainham Gaol Photo, Dublin, Ireland More Photos
Quote: A look at three days spent in Ireland's capital city.

Old Jameson Distillery

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Attraction | "Jameson Distillery Tour"

Old Jameson Distillery Photo, Dublin, Ireland
Quote:
As the introductory film rolls to an end on your Old Jameson Distillery tour, don’t forget one thing: raise your hand if you want to get a solid whiskey buzz. Housed at the old Jameson factory site, the slick Distillery tour unfolds over an hour or so as a truly self-masturbatory look at the history and success of the Jameson brand throughout the years. After the aforementioned film ends, you’re whisked through a recreated Jameson factory, following each step of the whiskey-making process from malting to bottling. It’s only at the end, before passing through the obligatory gift shop, that you’ll whet your whiskey whistle. In the first room, make sure to keep an eye out for Smitty the ...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on October 4, 2005

Old Jameson Distillery
Bow Street Smithfield Village
Dublin, Ireland
+353 (1) 807 2355

Kilmainham Gaol

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Attraction | "Kilmainham Jail"

Kilmainham Gaol Photo, Dublin, Ireland
Quote:
A visit to the local shopping mall can sometimes feel like strolling through a prison, except for the food court, Sharper Image, and pimply teenagers. After touring Kilmainheim Jail, an imposing stone fortress in far west Dublin, I realized that that mall-ish sense of conformity is, indeed, not entirely fortuitous. It was here at Kilmainheim Jail that some of Ireland’s most revered, and controversial, revolutionaries were held and ultimately executed. Thomas Russell, Robert Emmett, Wolfe Tone, and Michael Collins all did time in the jail, the design of which bucked the trend of that time period’s standard prison blueprint. Kilmainheim had true reform goals in mind for its inmates, i.e...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 4, 2005

Kilmainham Gaol
Inchicore Road
Dublin, Ireland
+353 1 453 5984

James Joyce Centre

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Attraction

James Joyce Centre Photo, Dublin, Ireland
Quote:
Housed in a beautifully restored Georgian townhouse at 35 North Great George’s Street, the James Joyce Centre is a wonderful homage to Dublin’s renowned novelist, with three floors dedicated to his life story and achievements. The history lesson begins before you even enter, in fact; just a few doors down from the townhouse, look for the small plaque on number 38. It was here that Sir John Pentland Mahaffay, former provost of Trinity College, once took up residence. What’s the significance to Joyce? Mahaffay once said that Joyce was a "living argument in favor of my contention that it was a mistake to establish a separate university for the aborigines of this island—for the corner-boys who spit into t...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on October 4, 2005

James Joyce Centre
35 North Great Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland
+353 1 878 8547

Mulligan's

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Attraction

Mulligan's Photo, Dublin, Ireland
Quote:
When you have a hankering for arguably the best pint of Guinness in the world, be sure to first check if there’s an All-Irish Hurling Championship that day. Otherwise, you might be left jostling for room amidst 200 or more drunken Cork fans just for a cold pint of suds. Having read about Mulligan’s storied reputation for serving the freshest, coolest pints of Guinness in all of Dublin, I took the short stroll over from nearby Trinity College early on a Sunday evening, only to find the moderately sized two-room bar was full to capacity, forcing the crowd to spill out into the street. Worried of sticking out like a sore thumb without a red-and-white Cork jersey or flag draped over my body, I decid...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on October 4, 2005

Mulligan's
8 Poolbeg St
Dublin, Ireland
+353 1 677 5582

Temple Bar

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Story/Tip

Temple Bar Photo, Dublin, Ireland
Quote:
It’s one of those trendy parts of town that’s supposed to be the mother brain of the city’s party zone. Temple Bar... Temple Bar... its very name suggests something worthy of worship, a place where all of life’s answers are poured into a murky pint of black Guinness draught. The only problem is that, just like at a Catholic church service, I left feeling strangely hollow when I was supposed to feel fulfilled. At times, as I tested my famously weak ankles on the cobbled stones lining Temple Bar, I felt that romanticized energy of the Irish people, the one I’d always imagined existed in Dublin. Street poets belting in Gaelic, the sound of violins somehow overcoming the roar of a packed pub and es...Read More