Manila Journals

Manila - a quick introduction

A June 1996 trip to Manila by Quan

Quote: I went to Manila on a business trip, and am offering some of my recollections from that trip. However, because of the short stay--three nights and two days--I did not see much of the city.

Manila - a quick introduction

Best Of IgoUgo

Overview

Quote:
I am not sure what to think about Manila, and whether to recommend it as a tourist destination. Generally, many tourists develop a love-hate relationship with Manila--they love the Filipinos, who must be the most hospitable people on earth, yet hated the immense contrast in Manila lifestyle, between the spacious, well-maintained communities and the overcrowded slum areas. There's not much to see--a few highlights are in the old city. I visited Manila on a business trip, so I did not get to see much of the city, or explore its attractions, but the following are some of the things I remember most. As you may expect, they are not of the sights, but of eating, shopping, and of the hotel Mandarin Orien...Read More

Mandarin Oriental Manila

Hotel | "Hotel Mandarin Oriental"

Quote:
Usually considered one of the deluxe hotels in Manila, Mandarin Oriental is located on Makati Avenue. Because the exchange rate is so favorable, you can actually savor great luxury for a reasonable price. Though it is always considered one of the top hotels, I don''t remember the rooms much, except that they were fairly sizable and functional. But the hotel has a great bar, and you can elect to be served by the pool, which is romantically lit in the evening. Not a bad place to spend an evening. One luxury that you can always enjoy in Asia, but which costs an arm and a leg in the States, is the spa service offered in most luxury hotels. I always go for the massage. For a fairly minimal pric...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on January 8, 2001

Mandarin Oriental Manila
Makati Avenue
Manila, Philippines 1226
+63 (2) 7508888

Shopping for handicrafts

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Attraction

Quote:
Many visitors go to Manila to shop, and no wonder. Manila offers many types of shopping experiences, from modern shopping centers full of department stores, supermarkets and specialty shops under one roof in Makati or Quezon City, to markets and cheaper stores around the Qiapo and St. Cruz area. You can buy anything from bargains to clothing to handicrafts. I love handicrafts, so I headed for Pistang Pilipino in Ermita, which is a large 'mall' containing dozens of small shops offering all kinds of handmade products such as shellcraft, rattan, hammock, and traditional Filipino clothes. There, I bought some Ilocano blankets, some basketrys, and my favorite, clay vases that have been handpainted ...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on January 8, 2001

Shopping for handicrafts
Pistang Pilipino
Manila, Philippines

Quote:
The walled city has massive walls that can be entered through seven gates. In the old times, only Spaniards and Spanish mestizos were allowed to live inside. The walled city contained 12 churches, chapels, convents, monasteries, and palaces. Elegant houses with wrought balconies were residences of the elites.

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on January 8, 2001

The Walled City of Old
Walled City
Manila, Philippines

Manila Cathedral

Attraction

Quote:
Come to this cathedral in mid-afternoon, when the sunlight strikes the stained glass windows which truly radiate. There are several groups of stained glass windows, each with a theme, though the main one is that of the Virgin Mary's life. The color is brilliant, and mainly tropical. Outside, the statues of saints are worth exploring, while the central door has panels to inform you of the building's history. Supposedly, the first cathedral at this site was built in the late 1500s, and the different cathedrals have been erected and destroyed. Manila Cathedral is the sixth, I believe, to be built on this site.

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on January 8, 2001

Manila Cathedral
Arzobispo Street
Manila, Philippines 1002
+63 2 527 5836

Eating out in Manila

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
I don't remember going to many restaurants in the three days we spent in Manila--instead, I reveled in eating at the stalls or cafeterias where you just point to a selection of dishes on display. Compared to the food of other parts of Southeast Asia--such as Thai, Malay and Indian--I think it is usual to call Filipino food boring, though that may be a bit unfair. One thing distinct about Filipino cooking is its ability to combine major ingredients together, such as pork and fish, chicken and shrimp. While growing up Chinese in Vietnam, I have eaten many roast suckling pig, but nowhere did it come with a sauce made predominantly of shrimp paste, strange at first, but addictive. While in Mani...Read More