Williamsburg Journals

Occupied Colonial Williamsburg - Under the Redcoat

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A June 2005 trip to Williamsburg by Taylor Shelby

Mary Dickinson Store Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia More Photos
Quote: I went to Colonial Williamsburg for Under the Redcoat, which is the reenactment of the British Occupation of Williamsburg in 1781. As a participant in the reenactment, I had a unique perspective, but my tourist side was well represented.

Occupied Colonial Williamsburg - Under the Redcoat

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Overview

Colonial Bathroom Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
I am a Revolutionary War Reenactor. I portray a camp follower in His Majesty's 64th Regiment of Foot. This was Colonial Williamsburg's Under The Redcoat, a reenactment of the British Occupation of Williamsburg during 1781. When I heard the event was being held in Williamsburg, I knew I couldn't miss it, not only because it is a wonderful event, but also because I had never been to Williamsburg. I had anticipated to go as a reenactor and not really spend a lot of time actually doing the stuff that the city is known for. Yeah, that lasted about 5 seconds. As soon as I walked into the town, I started planning the stuff I wanted to do. One of the days I didn't even dress in my colonial garb,...Read More

The Raleigh Tavern Bakeshop

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Restaurant

The Raleigh Tavern Bakeshop Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
The bake shop isn't so much a restaurant as it is, well, a bakery. I wandered in here one afternoon and grabbed a few rolls and some cheese, and it began a love affair that will go on forever. Let me introduce you to my new boyfriend, the Raleigh Bakeshop "Tavern Roll." You can buy these little hunks of heaven (3 for $2), throw them in your bag, and snack on them for the rest of the day. They are soft and wonderful and somehow manage to taste like one of those giant pretzels you get at a ball game. But there is a lot more than that. You can also get fabulous cookies ($1.50), cornbread, and various cakes. This is a good plan if you want a light lunch or a snack. I ate here quite a bit. You ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 30, 2005

The Raleigh Tavern Bakeshop
Behind the Raleigh Tavern
Williamsburg, Virginia 23185
757/229-1000

Mary Dickinson Store

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Attraction

Mary Dickinson Store Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
This was one of the first stops that I made in Colonial Williamsburg, not only because it is somewhat near the entrance but also because I was in dire need of a cap (no respectable colonial lady would be seen without!) and a hat. It was a good thing that I was here at the start, when I had money; otherwise I would have melted my credit card. The Williamsburg merchants offer really wonderful-quality products, even if they are a little on the steep side. One thing to keep in mind is that it is a non-profit site, so all that money you are pouring in is at least going back to education (hopefully that will soften the blow a bit). The Mary Dickinson store has an impressive selection of hats for lad...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 29, 2005

Mary Dickinson Store
Duke of Gloucester Street
Williamsburg, Virginia

The Governor's Palace

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Attraction

The Governor's Palace Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
One of the first major buildings you will see in Colonial Williamsburg is the Governor’s Palace. The large, elegant building capped with a cupola and flanked on both sides by dependency buildings sits majestically at the top of Palace Green, one of the major parks in the town. This is one of the buildings that is a "do-not-miss", and you will often see lines out front. The building you see today is a reproduction of the original building that was constructed in 1772 and burned in 1781. In that short timespan, it saw quite an impressive amount of history and some fabulous parties. Home to seven royal governors and two elected governors (you may have heard of them – Patrick Henry and Thomas Jeffe...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 30, 2005

The Governor's Palace
Palace Green
Williamsburg, Virginia
(757) 229-1000

Wigmaker

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Attraction | "The Wigmaker"

Wigmaker Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
Tucked into a tiny building just past the King's Arms Tavern is the Wigmaker. This is one of the many trades that you can learn more about in Williamsburg. They have recreated shops that are staffed by knowledgeable historians who are experts in their field. The wigmaker was one of the people that I really wanted to be able to talk to, because it fascinates me. I think that the practice of wearing wigs is very curious and it was so important in the 18th century. Most of the upper class, men and women, wore wigs. Or, at the very least, elaborate extensions. The shop is tiny, but it is filled with the most amazing stuff. There are wigs of every shape and size, along with all the tool...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 30, 2005

Wigmaker
Duke of Glouceser Street
Williamsburg, Virginia

Colonial Williamsburg

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Attraction | "The Post Office"

Colonial Williamsburg Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
The Post Office was one of my favorite stores in the historic area, and I found that I kept coming back to pick up something else. It sits on top of the Printing and Bindery office, one of the recreated Colonial trade shops. This is where you can find all your paper, printed, and writing goods, as well as a large variety of books. The shop is small, so it was usually pretty crowded. I liked it, though, because I actually felt like I was in a real colonial store. For one thing, all of the people who worked there were exceedingly friendly, even more so than the rest of the employees. I felt like I was talking to my neighborhood post-master in the 1950s or something, it was great. This...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on June 30, 2005

Colonial Williamsburg
134 Henry Street
Williamsburg, Virginia 23185
(800) 4447-679

Under the Redcoat

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Story/Tip

The 64th of Foot Photo, Williamsburg, Virginia
Quote:
Under the Redcoat is the annual (now in its twelfth year!) reenactment of the British occupation of Williamsburg, VA. In 1781, while on the march to Yorktown, Lord Cornwallis stopped for 10 days in Williamsburg. He brought with him the plague of locusts known as 8,500 British troops and over 12,000 followers of the army. While UTR is not quite to that enormus scale, it is representing the Provost Guard in full strength, with hundreds of re-enactors camping in Colonial Williamsburg for the weekend. Now, this is an event unlike most Revolutionary War events, in that it does not center around a battle, but around an encampment. There is no battle at Under the Redcoat. This is a chance for re...Read More