Timbuktu Journals

Timbuktu, Mali

A January 2005 trip to Timbuktu by drumzspace

Amanar Photo, Timbuktu, Mali More Photos
Quote: Timbuktu was our staging area before taking off to the Festival au Desert (see my other Timbuktu entry). We spent 2 days touring around the city and saw all we needed to see in this famous "remote" location.

Timbuktu, Mali

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Overview

Timbuktu Photo, Timbuktu, Mali
Quote:
For me, the highlight of the trip to Timbuktu was touring the mosque. Many other mosques, like the one in the tourist center of Mopti, do not allow non-Muslims to enter, but Timbuktu was different. If you find yourself there, you will most certainly be afforded the opportunity. Aside from the mosque, the artisan's market was interesting (as was the "regular" market). There is also the ethnological museum, which houses a few interesting artifacts from Timbuktu's past. Unfortunately, there isn't much else to recommend about Timbuktu, aside from being a place for a hot meal and a shower upon return from the Sahara. It's a fairly dirty town (even by African standards), and even thoug...Read More

Amanar

Restaurant

Amanar Photo, Timbuktu, Mali
Quote:
We ate here a number of times. They had consistently good food (I hope you like goat and couscous) and a nice atmosphere. It seems to be the "hip" place now in Timbuktu, as it's packed with tourists and local expats from Medecins Sans Frontiers nightly.

Cold beer is available, as is good music and a "dance floor".

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on April 29, 2005

Amanar
Across From The Flame Of Peace Monument
Timbuktu, Mali

Camel Riding, Crafts, and Haggling

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Story/Tip

Want a camel ride? Photo, Timbuktu, Mali
Quote:
Just about anywhere you go in Mali, you'll find people who know people who have a camel or who are musicians or "silversmiths" or whatever. Basically, they're selling something, and you'll have no trouble finding a souvenir trinket or experience. In fact, the only trouble you'll have is figuring out how to haggle properly. Malians have a "three stage" method of haggling. The first price you're given is never supposed to be the right one. You counter with your incredibly low price (figure about 25% of what you really want to pay). They'll scoff and tell you that they have a family to feed, etc., and then they'll start again. You counter their second offer with about 50% to...Read More