Paris Journals

Paris, City of Lights and Darks

A July 2000 trip to Paris by Harris

Quote: As beautiful as Paris is, and as many cultural experiences as it offers, I discovered a dark side to the city of lights, especially during the long walks underground between metro stops.

Paris, City of Lights and Darks

Overview

Quote:
The brightest spots in Paris are its art museums, especially the Impressionist collection of the Musee d'Orsay and the wild Cubism of the Picasso Museum. Quick Tips: Be prepared for lots of walking (translation: wear comfortable shoes), mediocre food (translation: pack provisions), and a language barrier even if you speak French (translation: bring a translator!).Best Way To Get Around: Paris is simply the biggest, most overwhelming city I've encountered; unfortunately, there is no best way to get around. Walking will take forever, but will allow you to take in the sites. The metro may seem like a good solution, but in fact, you will find that you have to do a lot of walking under...Read More

Little Regina

Best Of IgoUgo

Hotel | "Hotel Little Regina"

Quote:
You might say you get what pay for. This hotel was the closest I've come to a Bates Motel experience. The hallways were poorly lit and eerie, and we seemed to be the only patrons--perhaps because we were the only ones willing to stay there. I stayed up half the night shaking and the surrounding neighborhood wasn't exactly good either, despite the convenience of having the train station nearby.

Member Rating 1 out of 5 on July 4, 2000

Little Regina
89 boulevard de Strasbourg
Paris, France 75010
1 40 37 72 30

Musee National Picasso Paris

Attraction | "Picasso Museum"

Quote:
The Picasso Museum is a must-see, especially for devotees of Cubism. Housed in a beautiful building, the Hotel Sale, the collection covers Picasso's entire career and offers many surprises--like his interpretation of Manet's Le Dejeuner sur L'herbe. The colors and fancy of Picasso's paintings will challenge even those most skeptical of his distortions. Indoor and outdoor sculpture gardens add immeasurably to the experience.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 4, 2000

Musee National Picasso Paris
Hotel Sale 5, Rue De Thorigny
Paris, France 75003
+33 (1) 42 71 25 21

Musee d'Orsay

Attraction

Quote:
If you've only taken an introductory art history course or if you're a scholar of French art, you'll love the Musee d'Orsay. The building was once a railroad station and maintains its distinctive architecture. The collection consists of one masterpiece after another, including works such as Manet's Le Dejeuner Sur L'herbe, Manet's Olympia, Courbet's Artist in His Studio, Renoir's The Swing, Monet's Rouen Cathedrals and Van Gogh's self-portraits. Be sure to go out on the rooftop terrace which offers an excellent view of the city with the Louvre prominent on the horizon.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 4, 2000

Musee d'Orsay
62, Rue De Lille
Paris, France 75343
+33 (1) 4049-4994

Musee Rodin

Attraction

Quote:
Don't give it a second thought. With its impressive sculpture of The Thinker to welcome you, the Rodin Museum is a must for all visitors doing the cultural rounds of Paris. In addition to the many smaller sculptures housed inside, the grounds contain The Gates of Hell and the Burghers of Calais, as well as pretty gardens. Though you may have seen the same works in other Rodin collections around the world, seeing them in the painter's home country is a completely different experience.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 4, 2000

Musee Rodin
77, Rue De Varenne
Paris 75007
+33 (1) 44 18 61 10

Espace Dali

Attraction | "Salvador Dali Museum"

Quote:
While this collection of Dali's works shouldn't be your first stop in Paris, it's worth a visit if you have some extra time--or if you're a real fan of the surrealist. It's a fairly psychedelic experience, with strange lighting and an eerie audio. Some of the pieces are interesting and some are just plain creepy.

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on July 4, 2000

Espace Dali
11 Rue Poulbot Near Place Du Tertre
Montmartre, Paris 75018
+33 (1) 42 64 40 10

The Latin Quarter

Story/Tip

Quote:
The famous student area of Paris's left bank, the Latin Quarter was a bit too touristy for my taste. My first piece of evidence was the number of American tourists I ran into in the cafes there--including people I knew from high school!

On your first visit, there may be a certain charm to the twisting, pedestrian streets and the restaurant proprieters who stand in their doorways and beg you to eat at their establishment (in English--they can pick out Americans a mile away). By the second visit, you'll realize WHY they're begging you to eat their food and even the baguettes and pastries which once seemed so perfectly French may seem a bit stale.
Quote:
One of the most pleasant places to walk in Paris, the sidewalk along the Seine has the added bonus of the booksellers (or, as my French teacher used to call them, Les Bookinistes). Even if you can't read French, the vendors have many other wares, such as posters and postcards, that make great souvenirs or gifts for the tourist. Most of the booths are located on the Left Bank.