San Miguel de Allende Journals

Eat, shop, and sleep well in San Miguel de Allende

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A March 2005 trip to San Miguel de Allende by sararevell

Sleeping Well San Miguel Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico More Photos
Quote: During Semana Santa, residents of San Miguel de Allende pour onto the streets, bringing this small town literally to a stand-still. But even when a slower pace is enforced, there’s plenty for a curious tourist to explore and enjoy.

Eat, shop, and sleep well in San Miguel de Allende

Overview

san miguel street Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Quote:
Mercado de Artesanias Dining at Rincon de Don Tomas at Jardin Principal And the margaritas! Quick Tips: During Semana Santa, be sure to book ahead for accommodation. If you plan to go for a few days or with friends, think about renting an apartment. Weekly rentals start from around for a one-bedroom apartment. Here are some useful links: www.realestate-sma.com/RentalDirectory.htm www.san-miguel-house-rentals.com www.sanmiguelguide.com/rental-agents.htm The Easter Street processions are slow, so be prepared to either stop and watch for a while or find detours to get to destinations that require you to walk through the city centre. Also keep in mind...Read More

Sleeping Well San Miguel

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Hotel | "Sleeping Well in San Miguel"

Sleeping Well San Miguel Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Quote:
Staying in the centre of San Miguel de Allende may not be the best place for sensitive sleepers. Come sundown, the local community of cats and dogs are all out to exercise their vocal chords. But if you get used to the frequent howling and screeching, as we did, you’ll find that the centre of San Miguel is unquestionably the best place to stay, especially if you plan to stop in town for a short time. We stayed in a one-bedroom apartment being rented by my brother-in-law for the week on Reloj, right by the Mercado de Artesanias. The apartment was very spacious, clean, and simply but beautifully decorated with dark-wood furniture, bamboo blinds, and the traditional brown tiled floors to keep your ...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on April 21, 2005

Sleeping Well San Miguel
Reloj 100
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Rincon de Don Tomas

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Restaurant | "Eating Well at Rincon de Don Tomas"

Rincon de Don Tomas Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Quote:
This busy restaurant is in a prime location on Jardin Principal and has a full wall of open doors, allowing you to look out at the passersby in the square. The nonsmoking and smoking areas seem to merge into one, but if you sit by one of the doors, you’ll probably be able to avoid any second-hand smoke (we just got lucky, as no one lit up near us). Also try and sit downstairs rather in the dark upstairs balcony area. The high, dark-wood ceiling and the old windows and doors would suggest that this is an older restaurant, although the new wooden bar and contemporary light fixtures don’t quite fit in with the original architecture. Despite this, the food, the drinks, and the location turned us in...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 21, 2005

Rincon de Don Tomas
Portal de Guadalupe #2
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
(415) 152-3780

Ole-Ole

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Restaurant | "Eating Well at Ole-Ole"

Quote:
Another good food stop is Ole-Ole, tucked away on Loreta #66. The place is full of bullfighting memorabilia, including mounted bullheads – some that looked real and some not. During the Semana Santa, they had a very imposing display of Christ surrounded by dried flowers, oranges, and purple drapes at the entrance of the restaurant. The rest of the place is very colourful, though, with bright orange and yellow walls and tablecloths. It’s nicer to sit at the back of the restaurant, where long skylights give the feel of an open courtyard when compared to the darker area at the front. The quality and quantity of the food may have explained why the place was full of Americans when we visite...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on April 21, 2005

Ole-Ole
Loreta #66
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Tio Lucas

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Restaurant | "Dining Not So Well at Tio Lucas"

Quote:
With the big lunches we’d been eating, we managed to have only one evening meal out during our stay. It’s a shame then that we picked Tio Lucas at Mesones 103. Part of the decision was forced upon us, as it was Good Friday and many other places were closed. As you approach, the effusive welcome from the owner, the lively atmosphere, and the promise of "Las Mejores Carnes" all promise a good night out. On first look, the interior open courtyard, with its overhanging tree dressed with glowing red lamps, appears inviting, but the overall, quality of the food is very average, and again, the place is full of Americans. The only vaguely "Mexican" experiences to be had are the chips, spicy s...Read More

Member Rating 1 out of 5 on April 21, 2005

Tio Lucas
Mesones 103
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
+52 (415) 152-4996

Mercado de Artesanias

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Attraction | "Shopping Well at Mercado de Artesanias"

Mercado de Artesanias Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Quote:
Walking up Lucas Balderos, you’ll find the artisan market. It’s a narrow, colourful street that ends at the food market along Colegio. Along the way, you can pick up a wealth of souvenirs and can usually bargain if buying multiple items from the same stall or if you’re paying cash for something more expensive. We picked up some picture frames, glassware, and a painting on bark. There are also quite a few jewelry shops, especially around Jardin Principal, if you’re looking for silver pendants and earrings. The food market is a labyrinth of stalls where fruit, flowers, and other produce are stacked high above your head. There’s also a food court area where you can buy snacks and fruit juices. We s...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 21, 2005

Mercado de Artesanias
on Balderas at corner of Colegio
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Church 1 Photo, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Quote:
I’m not sure I could make much sense of the Semana Santa processions. I do know that it brings a lot of people into town, all of whom stand for extraordinary long periods of time outside one of the many churches – La Parroquia, San Francisco, Tercer Orden, Santa Casa de Loreno, San Felipe Neri – to catch a glimpse of the many effigies the processions carry in. The processions consist mostly of old women and young girls: the girls dress in white and carry an assortment of icons, jugs, and thorn crowns, and the old women dress in black and carry purple drapes, flowers, and blood-covered pillars! I noticed one tiny old lady carrying a cup of water to cool her in the heat and wondered if just a c...Read More