Mexico City Journals

Mexico City - A Resident Tourist's Review

A November 2004 trip to Mexico City by answerer

Turibus (sightseeing bus) Photo, Mexico City, Mexico More Photos
Quote: This is an review of the museums, monuments, and tourist locations visited while living in Mexico City

Mexico City - A Resident Tourist's Review

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Overview

Quote:
The Turibus(100-115 MXP) is a convenient way to see the major tourist destinations (especially the Centro Historico). The pyramids at Teotihuacan are highly recommended (although technically not in Mexico City).Quick Tips: It's best if you have a knowledge of Spanish. Unless you're at hotels, taxi drivers do not speak English, and restaurants rarely have English menus. Because Mexico City is so big, taxi drivers will not necessarily know an address that you give them so make sure you have the major cross streets.Best Way To Get Around: Be careful when taking taxis. Spend a bit more money and get taxis at a "Sitio" or from a hotel. Kidnappings are relatively common occurrences for peo...Read More

Tori Tori

Restaurant | "Tori Tori (Traditional Japanese)"

Quote:
As one of the more authentic Japanese restaurants in Mexico City, Tori Tori is known to be frequented by staff of the Japanese embassy. The menu is in Japanese and Spanish, and the manager appears to be Japanese. Tori Tori is located in the upscale district of Polanco and the clientele is similarly upper-class. Interestingly enough, there weren't too many people at 9pm but when we left at closer to 10:30pm, the place was filling up.The sushi rolls are well-made, creative and do not contain cream cheese (quite a rarity in Mexico). The Spicy Tuna roll was excellent with fresh tuna and just enough spiciness, and the Rollo Grande was enough to be a meal for one person. The seafood cr...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 17, 2005

Tori Tori
Anatole France 71 Loc. A y B
Mexico City, Mexico
(55)5280-9069

Churreria El Moro

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Restaurant | "Churreria El Moro (Churros and Chocolate)"

Quote:
El Moro is one of Mexico City's oldest churro places. However, don't expect to find what you've seen at Disneyland.Located on Eje Central near Metro San Juan de Letran, it's the perfect place to rest your feet and have a snack after looking at the street stalls and visiting Bellas Artes and Torre Latinoamericana. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem that anyone speaks English.Churros y chocolate is a breakfast snack originally brought by the Spanish to Mexico. It is eaten by dipping the churros into the chocolate. At El Moro, an order of four churros and a coffee cup-sized cup of chocolate costs 36 pesos. You can choose from re...Read More

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on May 7, 2005

Churreria El Moro
Eje Central Lázaro Cardenas 42
Mexico City, Mexico
055 5512 0896

Villa María

Restaurant | "Villa Maria"

Quote:
Villa Maria is in every guidebook, and deservedly so. Aside from the excellent Mexican food, the whimsical sayings (in Spanish) on the walls and mariachi band make this a must-visit. Something to watch out for is that they close at 7pm on Sundays. To start, the margaritas are huge. When they bring it out, you start wondering why they're bringing around a fishbowl before you realize that it's your drink. At about 2 pints (500mL) in size, it'll last you the whole meal. If you want something smaller, remember to ask for it. Menus are available in English, and most of the food there is suited for sharing. The chef's recommendations are all excellent, but if you can't handle spicy food, mak...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on May 7, 2005

Villa María
Avenida San Jerónimo Pte. 801
Mexico City, Mexico 10200
+52 5 595 4697

Adonis

Restaurant | "Adonis (Lebanese/Mediterranean)"

Quote:
Unknown to most visitors, Mexico City has a sizable population of Lebanese-decent. Adonis is one of Mexico City's oldest Lebanese restaurants and has managed to survive due to an extremely loyal clientele.

Aside from excellent Mediterranean food, it also has a belly dance show beginning at 10:30pm Thurs, Fri and Sat. (Our show started a bit after 11pm)

There are no English menus, but the Capitan appeared to speak English. The dishes are for sharing and if you're new to Lebanese food, I recommend the "Plato Libanes" and "Parillada Libanes" to try a bit of everything. My personal favorite are the Falafels.

Next door is a Lebanese market where items to go are sold.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 20, 2008

Adonis
Homero 424
México, Mexico 11560
+52 5 531 6940

Celtics Pub Condesa

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Attraction | "Celtics Pub - Polanco"

Quote:
The Celtic's Pub is one of the few places where you can get a Guinness in Mexico(although not on tap). There is another one in Col. Condesa that has been around for a bit longer but is essentially the same as the one in Polanco. It's location in the hotel zone (right in front of the W) makes it one of the hippest places to be seen. As with any other pub in Polanco, this place is always busy, no matter what day of the week. We had trouble finding a space at 7pm on Friday, and when we left at 10:30pm, you could hardly move around. The crowd is notably upscale with an average age in the mid-30s. There are about 20 tables of varying sizes, a few couches and a coin-operated pool table. ...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on April 17, 2005

Celtics Pub Condesa
Tamaulipas 36, Col. Condesa
Mexico City, Mexico
5211-9081

Mercado de la Ciudadela

Attraction | "La Ciudadela Artisan Market"

Quote:
La Ciudadela is a large artisan plaza located a 10-minute stroll from Metro Balderas or 5 minutes from Metro Juarezs. Handicraft/artisan items from all over Mexico are sold here at very reasonable prices. I highly recommend going here instead of the markets in Zona Rosa due to the broader selection and better prices. If you're near Bellas Artes, it's about a 15min walk. Walk down Juarez towards Reforma and turn left on Balderas. When you get out of the Balderas metro station, walk down the sidewalk with all the street vendors (don't take too long looking around, as the main attraction is farther down). After passing by a library and small park, you'll see a yellow wall an...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on May 5, 2005

Mercado de la Ciudadela
Parque De La Plaza De La Ciudadela Centro Histórico
México, Mexico 06040

Living - Gay Nightclub

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Attraction | "Living (Tecno/Electronic Danceclub)"

Quote:
http://www.living.com.mx/ Aside from its status as Mexico's premier gay-friendly nightclub, Living is also one of DF's best places for lovers of electronic music.Located in a castle-like building complete with a drawbridge on Reforma near Torre Mayor, Living has two main rooms, three lounges (including one nonsmoking, a rarity in Mexico), and three bars on two floors.This place is absolutely huge, and unlike most Mexican clubs, is actually a place for dancing (i.e. no tables in the middle of the "dance floor"). The lounges are for people who are more interested in sitting down and having a drink.The larger room plays electronic music, with a sound and ligh...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on August 17, 2005

Living - Gay Nightclub
Paseo De Reforma 483 Col. Cuauhtemoc
Mexico City, Mexico

Turibus (sightseeing bus)

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Attraction | "Turibus (Hop-on, Hop-off Bus Tour)"

Turibus (sightseeing bus) Photo, Mexico City, Mexico
Quote:
Website: http://www.turibus.com.mxAlthough the Metro is significantly cheaper at 2 Pesos, taking the open-air, double-decker Turibus is one of the most relaxing ways to visit the main tourist areas of Mexico City if you have a day (or at least 5-6 hours) to spare.The concept is the same as New York's Gray Line and London's Big Bus and Original Tour; for one price, you can get on and off as many times as you want during the day at stops marked by a large red banner. (See picture for example and website for stop details.) A bonus is the multi-language audio guide that gives you brief introductions to the sights on the trip (which takes 3 hours if you don't get off).It costs 100 P...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on May 29, 2006

Turibus (sightseeing bus)

Mexico city
(55) 5563-6693

Quote:
Digital cameras have become fairly popular in Mexico and thus, there are no lack of digital photo developing shops in the city.I personally prefer to use shops behind the Cathedral on Republica de Brazil because:1)They are near tourist attractions.2)They can give you digital 4x6 jobs in as little as 30 minutes, at a shockingly cheap 1 peso per print. If your memory card is getting full, drop by and have your images printed and burned to CDs (about 40-50 pesos) before you head to the Templo Mayor. After your visit, head back to the shop to pick up your prints. (Note: Most shops close around 3pm on Saturday and are not open on Sunday.)If you're using a traditional camera,...Read More

About the Writer

answerer

answerer
New Castle, Delaware