Papua New Guinea Journals

Papua Niugini - Still New

A February 2005 trip to Papua New Guinea by Bri like Cheese

Quote: It's difficult to describe a place that appeals to me so completely. The smell of copra oil, the children who found my freckles so amusing, and a culture so vivid and determined to maintain its heritage made PNG an unparalleled experience...

Papua Niugini - Still New

Best Of IgoUgo

Overview

Quote:
Definite highlights of Papua Niugini for me included the diving, local market, and culture. Diving in PNG is still great, as the reefs have yet to be heavily damaged by over fishing, run-off, deforestation, or disease. Large schools of fish still abound, and biodiversity is phenomenal. The dive master at Niugini Divers was knowledgeable, watchful, and enjoyed his job. The local market is also a highlight, showcasing many fruits, vegetables, and other goods that you'll never see state-side. However, beyond all the beautiful reefs and exotic fruits were the people themselves. Gracious, curious, and forever smiling, they are what made my trip memorable. If a local exhibition of dancing...Read More
Quote:
Hawaii has approximately 11 species of hard corals. French Polynesia has about 50. Papua New Guinea boasts over 700 different species of hard corals, making it the most epic diving I've ever done (which is not to say that I'm Jacques Cousteau, but I've done a little diving)! The first site the dive master took us to is known as Magic Passage and definitely lived up to its name. Our deepest point in the dive was at 120 feet, and there was a sandy bottom replete with large - lllaaaarrrggggeee!!! - Gorgonians, crinoids, barrel sponges, and a happily lazy white-tip reef shark. Anemones (mostly pink and Clark’s anemone fish species and their host anemones) were everywhere, along with the large...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on March 22, 2005

Madang Local Markets

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction

Quote:
It's difficult to say exactly which street the local market is on… It just exists, and if you ask any local (most speak some English), they'll point you in the right direction. All were friendly to me as a lone female, and many of the local kids followed me to see what I was doing. Tropical fruit is everywhere, and the locally grown peanuts are an interesting treat (they're boiled, I think). The daily catch is often displayed as well, and bargaining in the local currency, kina, is fierce. They accept dollars readily, however, and are amenable to bargaining. (Frankly, I didn't really think paying $2 versus $1 was bad if a child ate better, and I'm a sucker for the grandchildren’s smiles - I just...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 22, 2005

About the Writer

Bri like Cheese

Bri like Cheese
San Francisco, California

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