Savannah Journals

Strolling in Savannah

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A January 2005 trip to Savannah by zabelle

The Waving Girl Photo, Savannah, Georgia More Photos
Quote: Recognized as one of America's Top Ten Walking Cites, Savannah offers plenty of opportunities for even the casual stroller to stretch his or her leg muscles.

Strolling in Savannah

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Overview

The Waving Girl Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
Savannah now ranks as one of the most fascinating cities I have ever visited. I had no idea what an important role it has played in the history of our country. The most decisive British victory in the Revolutionary War was the Battle of Savannah. As a former Girl Scout, I was aware that this was where Juliet Gordon Low had founded the Girl Scouts, but I didn’t know how Savannah had embraced her. Four days was not enough time to do all that Savannah has to offer. I would recommend a minimum of 5 days, and I think I could have filled 7 days quite easily. 1. Savannah History Museum/Visitor Center: begin your visit here. Pick up brochures, visit the museum, and begin your plan....Read More

Gray Line Savannah Tours

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Attraction | "Gray Line Tour"

Gray Line Savannah Tours Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
One of my favorite ways to get oriented in a new city is to take a narrated bus tour. In Savannah, you have more choices than I have ever seen anywhere. In the parking lot adjacent to the history center, you will find all the trolley/buses lined up. The only difference that I could see was the color of the buses and a dollar or two in price. We opted for the Grayline Tour for no other reason than it was the first one in line. They offer an AAA/AARP discount. As it turned out, we were the last tour of the day at 4pm. In the summer, the last tour is 4:30pm. The bus will hold a maximum of 34 people. As it was, we were the only three people to take the tour. This is an open-air trolley with wooden seats, ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Gray Line Savannah Tours
215 West Boundry St.
Savannah, Georgia 31401
(912) 232-0685

Oglethorpe Trolley Tours

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Attraction | "Oglethorp Ghost Tour"

Oglethorpe Trolley Tours Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
Ghost tours are big business in Savannah. You would think the city was haunted!! You can take a walking tour, a trolley or bus tour, or, for a more macabre approach, there is a hearse tour. We opted for a trolley tour. We had several reasons for our choice. First, we had a half-price coupon, a very good reason indeed. Secondly, they would pick us up at our B&B, another excellent reason. Thirdly, though I liked the idea of a walking tour, after a whole day of walking, I wasn’t up to walking to the start location and back, not to mention walking on the tour. All the major trolley companies offer a ghost tour: Old Town, Grayline, Ogelthorpe and Old Savannah, and from what I saw they are all very s...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Oglethorpe Trolley Tours
7 Rathborne Road
Savannah, Georgia 31414
(912) 233-8380

Mercer House

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Attraction | "Mercer Williams House"

Mercer House Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
This is a beautiful house--the exterior is in the Italiante style, and it was constructed of Philadelphia Reds. That said, the tour price of $13.25 would be a joke if the owner, antique dealer Jim Williams, hadn’t shot Danny Hansford in the study. All this was made famous or infamous in the book "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil". The tour consists of walking through the garden with a guide and then touring four rooms, lasting about 20 minutes. This house had quite an interesting history even before if was purchased by antique dealer Jim William in 1970. There were two rather mys...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Mercer House
429 Bull Street, Monterey Square
Savannah, Georgia 31401

Andrew Low House

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Attraction

Andrew Low House Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
Born in Scotland, Andrew Low came to Savannah in 1848 to work as a cotton factor for his uncle. Factors were the men who determined the price of cotton. Factors Row in Savannah just above Riverwalk is where the factors would walk above the wagons of cotton, pricing them. It wasn’t long before Andrew was the richest man in Savannah. Low and Company had offices in Savannah and Liverpool. He was able to survive the unpleasantness by moving his operating headquarters to Liverpool. John Norris designed this home for him as well as several other famous Savannah buildings. Andrew was a man who was lucky in business, but his personal life was marred by tragedy. His first wife, Sarah, died at the young ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Andrew Low House
329 Abercorn St
Savannah, Georgia 31401
+1 912 233 6854

Davenport House Museum

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Attraction | "Isaiah Davenport House"

Davenport House Museum Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
You begin your guided tour of the Davenport House in the basement gift store, and a fine gift store it is. Tours begin every thirty minutes and last between 30 and 40 minutes. The two young women who we met working in the gift shop were both SCAD students. If you have AAA, you will receive a 10% discount here. Unlike some of the other houses that you visit in Savannah, Davenport House was more of the artisan class house. Isaiah Davenport was a master builder. He was well to do but not extremely wealthy. The public rooms of the house have wonderful architectural details. These rooms were a form of advertisement of the type of work that his customers could expect. The fireplaces are made of Itali...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Davenport House Museum
324 East State St
Savannah, Georgia 31401
+1 912 236 8097

Old Fort Jackson Historic Site

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Attraction | "Old Fort Jackson"

Old Fort Jackson Historic Site Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
Old Fort Jackson is located on a site known as Salter Island 3 miles from downtown Savannah. It is the oldest brick structure in the state of Georgia. It has been designated a National Historic Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is a very historic site; there was an earthen work "mud fort" on this site in 1776. It was abandoned because the site was considered unhealthy. In 1808, President Andrew Jackson began constructing a national defense system. Fort Jackson was among the forts commissioned. It was named for the Revolutionary War hero and Former Georgia Gove...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Old Fort Jackson Historic Site
1 Fort Jackson Road
Savannah, Georgia 31404
+1 912 232 3945

Owens-Thomas House

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Attraction | "Owen Thomas House"

Owens-Thomas House Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
William Jay was a young architect when he came to the Savannah and designed what is considered by many to be the finest English Regency House in the United States. The house was designed for the Richardson family. Mrs. Richardson was the sister in law of William Jay. The house was completed in 1819, and by 1820, Mr. Richardson had suffered financial reverses forcing the sale of the house. For the next ten years, it was used as a boarding house, and it was at this point that its most illustrious guest visited. The Marquise de Lafayette stopped here in 1825 and he addressed the citizens of Savannah from the cast iron balcony on the side of the house. In 1830, the house was purchased by ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 19, 2005

Owens-Thomas House
124 Abercorn St.
Savannah, Georgia 31401
(912) 233-9743

Telfair Art Museum

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Story/Tip

Telfair Museum Photo, Savannah, Georgia
Quote:
This is both a house and an art museum. The original house was designed by William Jay for Alexander Telfair in 1818. The plot of land on which the house is located is significant in Georgia History. It was the location of Government House, the residence of the Royal Governors of Georgia. Alexander was the son of Governor Edward Telfair and the sister of Mary Telfair. When he died in 1832, he left the house to his sisters Mary and Margaret. Both of the women were in love with the same man, William Hodgson, and Margaret married him. Mary never married; her will left the house to the Georgia Historical Society to be used as a public "academy of arts and sciences." The original house was enlarged and ope...Read More