Lisbon Journals

Decadent Lisbon

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A travel journal to Lisbon by Rucas

Castle of St. George (Castle of São Jorge) Photo, Lisbon, Portugal More Photos
Quote: Portugal’s capital is a easy-going city with a dramatic location. I discovered it has a charm all of its own: from flea markets to royal palaces, from trams to its Moorish districts.

Decadent Lisbon

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Overview

Foto 2 Photo, Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
First there is the city’s location: a dramatic clutter across hills that ripple to the broad River Tagus. The Atlantic is but a few kilometres away and the air always seems fresh. Climb to Castelo de São Jorge, which dominates one of the many hills in Lisbon. From turret to tower along its wide ramparts there are great views over a sea of tiled roofs to a startlingly massive statue of Christ. Following a devastating earthquake in 1755, most of Lisbon’s central area was rebuilt and these elegant, older parts stand out clearly from newer suburbs. Huddled against the castle walls and tumbling down the hillside is Alfama, Lisbon’s oldest district. It's a North African souk. A few minutes away, on Lisbon’s...Read More

Castle of St. George (Castle of São Jorge)

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Attraction | "Castle of St Jorge"

Castle of St. George (Castle of São Jorge) Photo, Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
It consists of the former citadel of Alcazar, twelve gateways (seven of which lead to the parish of Santa Cruz do Castelo), the battlements and wall of Barbeca (Barbican) and eighteen towers (eleven of which belong to the fortress, and one, Torre de Sao Lourenco, is linked to the battlements by a long stairway). If we go though Portao Sul (the south gate) which leads to Rua de Santa Cruz do Costelo, we enter the old Praca de Armas. The building was severely damaged by the 1755 earthquake. In 1910 the building was declared a National Monument and restoration work began.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on November 29, 2000

Castle of St. George (Castle of São Jorge)

Lisbon, Portugal

Mosteiro dos Jeronimos (Jeronimos Monastery)

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Attraction | "Jeronimos Monastery"

Mosteiro dos Jeronimos (Jeronimos Monastery) Photo, Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
The Jerónimos Monastery took almost a century to be built and reflects the prosperity of the Portuguese Empire during the Golden Age of Discoveries. It was built as a tribute to the courageous navigators who helped establish Lisbon as the hub of a thriving empire. Vasco da Gama is buried here. The Monastery is an outstanding example of Manueline architecture and was classified as a World Heritage site by UNESCO.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on November 29, 2000

Mosteiro dos Jeronimos (Jeronimos Monastery)
Praca do Imperio
Lisbon, Portugal 1400-206
+351 (21) 3620034

Belem Tower/Torre de Belem

Attraction | "Tower of Belem"

Quote:
UNESCO classified Belém Tower (shown left) as a world heritage site in 1983. It was originally built in 1520 to defend Lisbon against the threats of invaders. It used to reside somewhere near the middle of the River Tagus at Belém, but now it can be found clinging to the northern bank.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on November 29, 2000

Belem Tower/Torre de Belem
Avenida Da Brasilia
Lisbon, Portugal

Elevador de Santa Justa

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Attraction | "Santa Justa elevator."

Elevador de Santa Justa Photo, Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
The Santa Justa Elevator opened in 1902 and rises vertically some 45 metres from the Rua de Santa Justa in the Baixa area of central Lisbon to the Chiado district. The structure houses two staffed lifts which normally allow direct access to the Carmo square and its monastery ruins, which are now an archaeological museum. The vertical column measures some 7m x 7.5m and the lift was originally powered by a steam engine mounted on its summit. Since 6 November, 1907 it has been electrically powered.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on November 29, 2000

Elevador de Santa Justa
Rua do Ouro at Rua de Santa Justa
Lisbon, Portugal

Carmo Monastery

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Attraction

Carmo Monastery Photo, Lisbon, Portugal
Quote:
Construction on this Carmelite church began at the end of the 14th century, although problems with its foundation delayed completion for years. It was finished in the finest Gothic style to become the second largest church, after the Sé (Cathedral), in Lisbon. Then the great earthquake toppled its ceiling. That part of the church that survived intact now houses the Museu Nacional de Arqueología, but most of the church was never rebuilt, so it serves today as dramatic evidence of that cataclysm. Past the entry there is a startling grassy sward, skeletal walls, apse, and arches.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on November 29, 2000

Carmo Monastery
Largo do Carmo
Lisbon, Portugal