Djibouti Journals

The Beauty of Djibouti

An October 2000 trip to Djibouti by Maggiezed

Quote: A peek at a little visited city on the Horn of Africa.

The Beauty of Djibouti

Overview

Quote:
Activities are limited in the hottest capital city in the world. Should you find yourself in the port of Djibouti, head for the Camel Market where you'll find...no camels!! It is open 8am until noon, then reopens at 4 pm.

Quick Tips:

Please dress conservatively and respect the Muslim culture. It is best to cover legs and arms.

French, Arabic, Somali and Afar (a local language) are spoken here. Some English.

Best Way To Get Around:

Taxis are the preferred means of transportation. This is a third world nation so bargaining is normal here. The roads are not the best so make sure you have good walking shoes on.
Quote:
This is a very nice hotel and certainly up to Sheraton''s high standards. It would be a very good starting off point even though it is on the expensive side. A good place to stay while you are looking for a first class hotel - many are run down.


Beware the $10 US Heineken beer from the bar!

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on November 15, 2000

Quote:
These restaurants are moderately priced and grouped with some French cafes in Place Menelik. Since I was on a cruise ship I didn't pluck up courage to sample the food. Warnings prevail regarding salads, tap water and dairy products.

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on November 15, 2000

Quote:
The Republic of Djibouti is 8,949 square miles with a population of 577,000. It was the last French colony in Africa until its independence in 1977. There are still French troops stationed permanently in Djibouti and the nation remains dependent on French aid. Bordered by Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea and the Gulf of Aden it is little more than a port,created in 1888, and a rocky desert. There are salt lakes and pans while agriculture struggles to provide a few vegetables. There is seasonal rain between November and April when inadequate drainage turns the roads to rivers, otherwise it is HOT and dry. The cattle are scrawny, camels, goats and sheep do well. The omnipresent fly flour...Read More

Camel Market

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
The camels are gone. I think the flies chased them out. About a 10-minute taxi drive should put you in the Camel Market, a street offering all kinds of tourist souvenirs. Most taxi drivers know some English, and through caramel-colored teeth try to point out places of interest. With motions of folding money into his breast pocket, our driver showed us the expanse of the Presidential Palace. Another country where the rich get richer, and the poor get children...... The market is an exciting bedlam of trade, one part for tourists and the produce market for locals. Within the call of the mosque, stall owners and street hawkers vie for the US dollar. French tourists tend to pay more ...Read More