Cape Town Journals

Two Oceans ~ One Hope

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A December 2003 trip to Cape Town by Gaires2359

Victoria and Alfred Waterfront - Alfred Mall Photo, Cape Town, South Africa More Photos
Quote: Cape Point: where two oceans meet ~ the Atlantic and Indian Oceans crash on the fairest cape in the entire world.

Two Oceans ~ One Hope

Overview

Cape of Good Hope Photo, Cape Town, South Africa
Quote:
I’ve finally gotten round to writing this, it’s taken a while only, because I’d loaned my maps, notebook, and diary to a colleague who visited there for a while. Here’s a short excerpt of what’s to come. Do look out over the next few days for more. Cape Town lies on a small peninsula at the southern tip of Africa which juts into the Atlantic Ocean, it’s South Africa’s premier tourist destination and 4th largest urban centre. Enriched by Dutch, British and Cape Malay influences, the cosmopolitan atmosphere is a unique blend of cultures. Cradled at the foot of its most famous landmark Table Mountain Cape Town is bounded by Devil’s Peak to the east and Lion’s Head to the west. Table Bay harb...Read More

Table Mountain

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Attraction

Table Mountain Photo, Cape Town, South Africa
Quote:
Cape Point juts into the southern Atlantic Ocean and forms the tip of the peninsula’s rugged mountain chain, which stretches from Table Bay, soaring out of the sea to a height of 1,087m above sea level, dwarfing the high-rise buildings of the city and its surrounding suburbs. A scenic drive leads to the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve, which offers hiking and mountain biking trails. The less energetic can ride the funicular to a lighthouse and superb views. The Cape Peninsula’s most prominent feature, Table Mountain, has been a welcome landmark for travellers. Its impressive front wall, as well as the surrounding buttresses and ravines, is a spectacular natural wonder. The r...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 4, 2004

Table Mountain
Cape Town 7848
Cape Town, Western Cape 7848
00 27 21 7156136

Victoria and Alfred Waterfront - Alfred Mall

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Attraction | "Victoria & Alfred Waterfront"

Victoria and Alfred Waterfront - Alfred Mall Photo, Cape Town, South Africa
Quote:
Cape Town’s successful waterfront project was named after the son of Queen Victoria. In 1860, a young Prince Alfred initiated the construction of the first breakwater in stormy Table Bay by toppling a load of rocks that had been excavated from the sea floor into the water. The Alfred Basin, which was subsequently created, successfully protected visiting ships from the powerful gales howling around the cape in winter that had previously caused an alarming number of vessels to flounder. The Victoria & Alfred Waterfront, or V&A, is a shopper’s haven, offering designer boutiques and others selling quirky hand-painted clothing, health and beauty products, home wares, and specialty gift...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on December 4, 2004

Victoria and Alfred Waterfront - Alfred Mall
Dock Road
Cape Town, South Africa 8001
+27 21 408 7500

Robben Island/Robben Island Museum

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Attraction | "Day Trip to Robbe Eiland"

Quote:
Named "Robbe Eiland" (seal island) by the Dutch in the mid-17th century due to its abundant seal population, Robben Island has seen much human suffering. As early as 1636, it served as a penal settlement and was taken over by the South African Prisons Service in 1960. When the last political prisoners were released in 1991, the South African Natural Heritage Programme nominated the island for its significance as a seabird breeding colony – rare species include the migrant Caspian tern and jackass penguin. Today, the island is an important ecological and historical heritage site. This flat, rocky island lays about 11km north of Cape Town in the icy Atlantic Ocean. Composed mainly of blue s...Read More

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on December 6, 2004

Robben Island/Robben Island Museum
Table Bay
Cape Town, South Africa 8002
+27 (0)21 409 5100

Bo-Kaap Photo, Cape Town, South Africa
Quote:
The Malays had a significant influence on the Afrikaans tongue, and many of their culinary traditions were absorbed by other cultures. The original Malays were brought to the Cape from 1658 onwards by the Dutch East India Company. Most of them were Muslims from Sri Lanka, Indonesian islands, and India. A large number of them were slaves, while others were political exiles of considerable stature. After slavery was abolished in the early 1830s, the Cape Malays (or Cape Muslims, as they now prefer to be called) settled on the slope of Signal Hill, the traditional home of the Cape Muslim community in an area called Bo-Kapp ("above Cape Town") to be near the mosques that had been built th...Read More