Kuala Lumpur Journals

Kuala Lumpur, the 'muddy rivermouth'

A travel journal to Kuala Lumpur by sengweetoh

Quote: Do you know that Kuala Lumpus actually means 'muddy rivermouth' in Malay? Well, the Twin Towers are definitely magnificent, and the multi-culture community is fascinating, but I will only tell you what to eat in Malaysia because it only takes you one second to fall in love with this country.
Quote:
In Malaysia, you can just find a hawker stall in lots of places at night, sit by a table under the tree, and order a mee goring while enjoying the refreshing night breeze.

The Chinese and Malay make great fried noodles, but the one made by the Malay (called mee goring) is what I am recommending here. You won't believe how some simple ingredients can make such a great cuisine, and a few drops of lemon juice will make the noodle perfect.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on August 14, 2005

Mee Goreng (Fried Noodle)
Throughout Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Roti Canai

Restaurant

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Roti canai, or what Indians call roti prata, has a breathtaking cooking process and heaven-like taste. You need a sizzling iron plate and something similar to gluten. And the cook just tosses the gluten in the air like he is juggling, and before you know, it looks like a piece of paper, only thinner.

There are various types of roti canai; you can put egg, banana, onion, butter… anything you want, and have it crispy or tortilla-like. Dip it into a sauce we call gua (tastes like curry) or have it the way it is.

Roti canai is one of the few things that define Malaysian cuisine. You can find it at the stall offering Mee Goreng.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on August 14, 2005

Roti Canai
Throughout Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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This can only be found in Southeast Asia, particularly in Malaysia and Singapore. The chicken is boiled to the degree in which it couldn't be more tender and juicier and seasoned with sesame oil.

The rice is also specially made by adding chicken oil essence. The chilli sauce is special, sweet but not too spicy.

This is the most unique and exotic food for Chinese residing in Southeast Asia, a perfect combination of local and traditional Chinese culinary art.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on August 14, 2005

Hai-Nan Chicken Rice
Throughout Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Ice Kacang

Restaurant

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It’s similar to the sliced ice in Taiwan, but tastes different. They also put beans, jelly, and milk on it. One thing that is unique to this Malaysian-style slice ice is that there is cendol in it.

Cendol is a green jelly invented by the Indians (I am not sure about its origin). It looks like the sticky stuff you sneeze out when you're having a very, very serious flu, but it tastes really good. In an equatorial country like Malaysia, ice kacang is one of the most popular coolants.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on August 14, 2005

Ice Kacang
Throughout Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Satay

Restaurant

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If you ask me what particular food defines Malaysian cuisine, this is definitely on the top of my list.

Satay is basically a brochette with a meat of your choice (pork, beef, chicken, mutton, etc.). They grill it on charcoal and brush it with their special sauce. It is usually accompanied by ketupat (a rice brick covered with coconut leaves). You can dip it into a homemade peanut-curry sauce or have it the way it is.

Believe me, you will have one stick followed by another and will hardly be able to stop.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on August 14, 2005

Satay
Throughout Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia