Stirling Journals

Stirling Quality

A travel journal to Stirling by miss_vixen

Quote: Stirling became a city in 2003, but it still has all of its small town feeling. It is one of the most historic locations in Scotland, the gateway to the wild and rugged highlands but easily reached from Edinburgh or Glasgow. This is a guide for things to do and places to visit.

Stirling Quality

Overview

Quote:
Places to visit: Stirling Castle. Bannockburn Battlefield. Wallace Monument. The University Campus. Possibly the most beautiful place to go to university in the world. The picturesque village and cathedral in Dunblane. Things to do: Walk up Cowane Hill to the cannon for a view of the city. Climb Dumayat, the hill behind the university for a bird's eye view of the castle, Wallace monument, and the city. Quick Tips: Above the 'carse' (the river valley) in which Stirling is located is Sheriffmuir, a bleak moor just minutes from the city. The Bouzy Rouge at the Sheriffmuir Inn in a fantastic cozy pub and restaurant on the moor between...Read More

National Wallace Monument

Best Of IgoUgo

Attraction | "Braveheart, the true story."

Quote:
The Wallace monument lies under the Ochil hills, on top of a rocky promontory just outside Stirling, making it easy for visitors to find. There is a gift shop at the bottom of the hill, selling all the usual tartan tat that tourists like, and a sculpture of Wallace (looking a little like Mel Gibson). From here it is possible to get a lift up to the tower in a Land Rover, but it only takes around 10 to 15 minutes to walk up the road through the woods, depending on your fitness. Quite often there is a piper playing on the hill, you can hear it for miles. The monument costs between £3 and £4 to get in, and this is worth it for the spectacular view from the top. On a clear day you can see as far...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on April 18, 2004

National Wallace Monument
Summit of Abbey Craig
Stirling, Scotland FK9 5LF
+44 (1786) 472140

Beltane

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Attraction

Quote:
Beltane is the old Celtic name for Mayday (1st May) when the ancient people of Scotland celebrated the sun and its power by lighting bonfires. The name comes from Bel, the pagan god of the sun. The festival was recently revived in Stirling, as well as other places around Scotland. Bonfires are built in the park by old Stirling Bridge, which is a popular visitor site, and there is a parade of people with flaming torches and drums round the streets of the city until the bonfire is lit. At this time of the year it doesn't get dark until well after 11pm, but as the sun 'dies' its light is kept alive by the light from the fire. We celebrated our Beltane with a BBQ and beers in the garde...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 18, 2004

Beltane
Locations around Stirling
Stirlingshire, Scotland

By Yon Bonny Banks

Attraction

Quote:
A true taste of the highlands, but less than an hour’s travel from Stirling or Glasgow, Loch Lomond and the Trossachs is Scotland's first National Park, founded in 2002. It covers a diverse range of landscapes, from the mountains and sea lochs of the west to the high glens around Breadalbane. Loch Lomond itself lies along the Highland Boundary Fault, which marks the transition from the lowlands around Glasgow and Edinburgh to the mountainous and wild highlands. The town of Callender lies at the centre of the park, and was the home of the outlaw Rob Roy, made famous in the book by Sir Walter Scott and the film starring Liam Neeson. There is a visitor centre dedicated to the legend in the town ce...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 22, 2004

By Yon Bonny Banks
Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park
Stirlingshire, Scotland

Night oot oan the ran dan.

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Story/Tip

Quote:
Pubs, clubs, bars and other stuff: My favourite pub in Stirling is O'Neills, an Irish pub in the city centre. It provides Guinness and Magner's cider as well as all the usual drinks. On Thursday and Sunday evenings they host live traditional Irish and Scottish music, and the place has a great atmosphere. The food is quite good, very filling and good value for money. Another friendly pub is Droothy Neebours, which means thirsty friends and takes its name from the poem 'Tam o'Shanter' by Rabbie Burns. The ceiling is decorated with a scene from the poem, and the pub is decorated to look like a traditional bothy. If you prefer bars to pubs then Obo Eru is the place to go, tucked in th...Read More