Oregon Coast Journals

Sheer Beauty: The Oregon Coast

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An October 1998 trip to Oregon Coast by reef2020

Oregon Reflections Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon More Photos
Quote: A 10-day journey along the Oregon Coast, with just a smidge of Washington and California thrown in.

Sheer Beauty: The Oregon Coast

Overview

Oregon Reflections Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon
Quote:
Where to begin! The national parks are always a highlight on any trip and Fort Vancouver, Fort Clatsop, Oregon Caves and Redwood National Park (yeah, I know its in California, but its SOOOOOO close!) were no exception to that rule. We also ate and drank our way through the area, visiting cheese factories, candy factories, fish smokehouses, a brandy distillery, wineries and a cranberry farm. Being from the East Coast, our biological clocks were waking us up before dawn. We took advantage of that to go out beachcombing nearly every morning, and now have beautiful souvenirs of stones, sand dollars and driftwood to remember our trip by.Quick Tips: Take it slow! Sure, you can drive the...Read More

Food Pleasures

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Attraction | "Berries and brandy and cheese, oh my!"

Food Pleasures Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon
Quote:
We found some great restaurants on our trip, including "Der Rhinelander" German restaurant in Portland (awesome swiss cheese fondue!), and a great Mongolian Barbecue in Coos Bay. We really enjoyed the Tillamook cheese factory, and their free samples, the Mexican Hot Chocolate (available just about everywhere at little roadside coffee stands), the Bandon Cheese Factory (more free samples!), A cannery down around Golds Beach, and the many wineries of the Willamette Valley. Our two favorite "food" places, though, had to be Faber Farms (a cranberry farm near Bandon) and the Brandy Peak Distillery. Learning how cranberries are grown and harvested was really fascinating, and the incredible v...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 20, 2001

Food Pleasures
Oregon Coast
Oregon Coast, Oregon

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

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Story/Tip

Yum! Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon
Quote:
Fort Vancouver isn't in Oregon, and it isn't on the coast, but it is a worthwhile stop if you fly in or out of Portland because it is just across the Columbia River from the airport. Back in the 1800s, the Pacific Northwest was (and still is) rich in natural resources. Especially notable among those resources were beavers. Trapping the animals was important back then because hats were in high style, and beaver fur was the best for making felt hats. Even today, felt hats have an "X rating," but there's nothing pornographic about them! The X (as in a 10X felt hat) refers to the ratio of beaver fur to rabbit fur in the felt. Each "X" is equal to 5% beaver fur, so a 10X hat was half and hal...Read More

Fort Clatsop National Memorial

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Story/Tip

Fort Clatsop National Memorial: Arrival Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon
Quote:
This is a real gem in the National Park System crown. It is the location of the winter encampment of the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1805-06. Set in a beautiful pine forest near Astoria, Oregon, the site is home to a 1955 reconstruction of the actual fort, built according to a floor plan drawn by William Clark. Despite nearly three months of constant rain, the Corps of Discovery ate well, and readied themselves for their return journey back east. Trails through the forest lead to a pretty little spring and to the landing on the Lewis and Clark River. Interpretive signs along the way, as well as beautiful exhibits in the visitor center really bring out what an amazing feat the expedition was. ...Read More

The Marble Halls of Oregon

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Story/Tip

Oregon Caves National Monument: Cave Formations Photo, Oregon Coast, Oregon
Quote:
Beneath the Siskiyou forest, near Cave Junction Oregon, are a series of beautiful underground chambers decorated with stone flowers, pillars and draperies. Oregon Caves National Monument became a unit of the National Park System in 1907. I found this to be a rather strange little park. Though the caves were beautiful, I found the forest above to be more so. Another odd bit was that we did not see a park ranger the entire time we were there. The tours were run by a concessioner, and the guides were surly at best. Fortunately, the National Park Service has since taken over the cave tours, so things should be much better now. The cave was discovered (as so many were) by a hunter chasing a bear. There ...Read More