Hammamet Journals

A Week in Hammamet

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An October 2002 trip to Hammamet by fizzytom

Les Citronniers Photo, Hammamet, Tunisia More Photos
Quote: My guide to a low budget week in the sun. A little sightseeing, a bit of shopping, a lot of eating, but most of all, relaxation and seven days away from dodgy England autumn weather.

A Week in Hammamet

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Overview

Quote:
See my guide to Tunis (another journal). Try your hand at haggling in the medina, battle with the locals to take a bus to Nabeul on market day (like going 7 rounds with Tyson!), but most of all, relax on clean, sandy beaches, cooling off now and again in the clear blue sea.Quick Tips: Take advice from locals about jellyfish. I swam right into one and believe me it hurts! We were told that the unusually hot temperatures for the time of year explained the jellyfish, which are usually a problem in July/August. If you can't bear to have a mate wee on you (although the pain might persuade you otherwise), follow the advice we were given. Cut a tomato in half and rub it over the affected area. The r...Read More

Les Citronniers

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Hotel

Les Citronniers Photo, Hammamet, Tunisia
Quote:
We travelled from England as a package deal, but it's possible to book directly with the hotel. The hotel is graded at 2-star, which we found suprising, given the high level of service and the comfort and cleanliness of the hotel. Most rooms are twins but there are a small number of triples. All rooms have private facilties (WC, bath/shower)and all rooms have a safety deposit box. All rooms have a small balcony, luckily ours looked over the pool but some look over the road. The hotel is situated 300m from the beach and there is a footpath which takes you straight there. There are bars, cafes, shops and restaurants close by and it's located about 4km from Hammamet town centre. Breakf...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 26, 2003

Les Citronniers
Avenue de Nevers
Hammamet, Tunisia
(72) 281-650

The Belle Vue

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Restaurant

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We ate here on the last night of our holiday and found it a good choice to say goodbye to Tunisia. The restaurant is situated close to the Medina and town centre and is on the first floor, with a cafe-bar below. Whilst not large, the restaurant has ample seating. When presented with the menus, we were given a complimentary aperitif of a delicious peachy-flavoured drink. And having ordered, we were brought bread, olives and a few little dishes of different salads and some lovely feta-like crumbly, soft cheese. The mains were great. I went for the crevettes and was served half a dozen enormous specimens in their shells dripping with chilli-infused oil. My partner had the dorade cooked in the local...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 8, 2003

The Belle Vue
Avenue Habib Bourguibba
Hammamet, Tunisia

Sinbad Hotel Bar

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Attraction

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Although the drinks here are a little moe expensive than general bars and most hotel bars, I feel that this place deserves a mention because of the fantastic service and beautiful setting. The Sinbad is a luxury hotel with its own private beach area and is set in gorgeous grounds filled with wonderfully scented plants and trees. We stopped off here while walking into the centre of Hammamet and stumbled upon a real find. The bar was completely empty when we arrived, I guess most people were in their rooms getting ready for dinner. There is a comfortable lounge bar indoors, tastefully furnished as you would expect from this kind of hotel. We chose to sit just outside the bar in a cover...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on July 14, 2003

Sinbad Hotel Bar
Sinbad Hotel, Avenue des Nations Unies
Hammamet, Tunisia

The Medina

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Story/Tip

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Hammamet's medina overlooks the sea, next to a pretty sandy beach where the fishing boats lie for the evening. As soon as you approach the medina you will be besieged by young men trying to lure you to the family shop inside the medina walls. Usually they will greet you like an old friend claiming that you should recognise them because they are the waiters from your hotel. The first time you visit a medina can be quite daunting, especially for women. Mny of the men will try to grab your hand, touch you, or even ask for a kiss. Usually you can tactfully shake them off, but if they persist, a stern "labass" or "la shukran" should do the trick. If you are purposely looking to buy tacky ...Read More

How to (or not to) haggle

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Story/Tip

Quote:
In the markets and the medinas of Tunisia, you are expected to haggle. Haggling is fun and, if you do it properly, will make sure that you don't go home with some worthless rubbish you've paid a fortune for. To start off, don't start haggling for something you've no intention of buying in the first place. Don't waste the shopkeeper's time. If you mention a price, you are obliged to pay it -- your role is to go up not down! You should roughly end up paying a third of the price the stallholder originally demands, but this is not always the case. Don't insult the trader by sticking to a ridiculously low price. Think about how much you would pay for the item at home and work accordingly. A...Read More

Market day in Nabeul

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Story/Tip

Quote:
I have an idea for a new concept in travel and tourism. We all know about "eco-tourism," well I am going to be the architect of "taste-tourism." As I tell you about my trip to Nabeul it will, hopefully, become clear. We decided to take the public bus service from Hammamet to Nabeul and waited at the bus stop just round the corner from our hotel. No one else was waiting so we decided to take a chance and hang on. There was no timetable so we had no idea how long we might have to wait. Luckily it wasn't too long. We scrambled on board and the rather grim-faced driver gestured for us to move back away from the doors. There were already a number of people standing so we moved towards them. But the d...Read More