Grand Canyon Journals

TRAIN, A GRAND WAY to see Grand Canyon

An April 2003 trip to Grand Canyon by TRAVELPRO guide

Grand Canyon  Photo, Grand Canyon, Arizona More Photos
Quote: We had always wanted to see Grand Canyon, but we didn’t have the stamina for hiking or mule riding. We decided to ride the Grand Canyon Railway and then take a bus tour to view the Canyon from observation points. It proved to be the right choice.

TRAIN, A GRAND WAY to see Grand Canyon

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Overview

Grand Canyon  Photo, Grand Canyon, Arizona
Quote:
Our grand adventure in Grand Canyon started in Williams, Arizona. After a hearty breakfast,we followed the train tracks to the lively cowboy gunfight show held prior to the train’s departure. We rode coach class going up and first class coming back. We recommend paying the extra for first class because we had more leg room plus free drinks and food. We feasted on cheeses, crackers, dips, vegetables, and champagne poured in long-stemmed plastic glasses. Strolling fiddle players entertained us with Old West folk tunes both ways, which made the two-hour trip go very fast. When our train puffed into Grand Canyon Village about lunchtime, we rushed over to an observation point to...Read More

Fray Marco's Hotel

Hotel | "Fray Marcos Hotel"

Fray Marco's Hotel Photo, Grand Canyon, Arizona
Quote:
We booked lodging at the Fray Marcos Hotel, expecting to stay in an old refurbished hotel next to the historic railroad depot. Instead we drove up to a new handsome new structure adjacent to the original old hotel. In the spacious lobby, original oil paintings stunningly displayed the awesome beauty of the Grand Canyon.

The hotel has a large indoor pool and exercise rooms.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 27, 2003

Fray Marco's Hotel

Grand Canyon, Arizona

Max & Thelma's Restaurant

Restaurant | "Max and Thelma's Restaurant"

Quote:
After spending a restful night in our deluxe room at the Fray Marcos, we walked the adjacent Max and Thelma’s Restaurant for a hearty breakfast buffet. You also can order for the menu.

A miniature train was rolling above the windows, which the children loved.

It is a large and very clean family restaurant. Come at least an hour before the train departures as it may get crowded and you may have to wait to be seated.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 27, 2003

Max & Thelma's Restaurant
231 North Grand Canyon Blvd
Williams, Arizona 86046
+1 928 635 8970

Grand Canyon Railway

Attraction | "Grand Canyon Railway Museum"

Grand Canyon Railway Photo, Grand Canyon, Arizona
Quote:
The museum located inside the old Harvey House restaurant next to the depot. Until the 1920s, most passengers, including four presidents, arrived at Grand Canyon via the Santa Fe train.

We liked seeing the trays and silver-plated serving pieces used on the white tablecloths when you dined at a Harvey House.

Most large railroad station had a Harvey House inside it for quick dining and fine dining.

The train ceased to operate in 1968, but in 1989 the Grand Canyon Railway started carrying passengers again on revamped steam locomotives.

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on May 27, 2003

Grand Canyon Railway
233 N Grand Canyon Blvd
Williams, Arizona 86046
+1 800 843 8724

Twisters Soda Fountain-Route 66 Place

Restaurant | "Historic Route 66 through Williams, AZ"

Twisters Soda Fountain-Route 66 Place Photo, Williams, Arizona
Quote:
The next morning after our train ride to Grand Canyon, we explored downtown Williams by driving up and down historic Route 66 where we saw lots of original motels and restaurants.

We admired the classic cars parked near Twister’s, a '50s diner. A mannequin dressed in '50s style clothes with ruffling petticoats greeted us at the door.

he nostalgia of cruising Route 66 added a final plus to our Grand Canyon trip. We had traveled along Route 66 in other places, but we especially enjoyed seeing how Williams must have looked when Route 66 carried lots of traffic.

Twisters Soda Fountain-Route 66 Place
417 East Route 66
Williams, Arizona 86046
928-635-0266