Tunisia Journals

Louage to Tunis

Best of IgoUgo

A September 2002 trip to Tunisia by fizzytom

Quote: Day trip to Tunis from Hammamet by louage - the sights, sounds and smells of the city.

Louage to Tunis

Overview

Quote:
Spend hours wandering round the mysterious alleyways of the medina. Quick Tips: You will be approached immediately by stall holders intent on selling you anything and everything. In the medina, there are a number of shops with access to the roof, giving you a fantastic view of the city. The shopkeeper will tell you all about the city and his family and on the way downstairs will inevitably steer you into a room full of carpets. If you aren't interested, say so from the beginning. This goes down better than letting them display all their wares. But do agree to use the roof to view the sights if invited. It's fantastic.Best Way To Get Around: Tunis has a a tram system which covers the ...Read More

Travelling by Louage

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
A louage is basically a big taxi. Most towns have a louage point - a noisy and usually fume-filled parking lot where the white and red vehicles wait until they have as many passengers as possible before setting off. When you arrive speak to one of the drivers and tell them your destination. He'll wave his hand vaguely, try to head in that direction and you'll probably need to ask again to be told which vehicle to get in. You are meant to wear seatbelts, the driver usually doesn't although the signs over the motoway says he should. Locals usually have a word with the driver to arrange to be dropped off places other than a town's official louage station, my advice would be to stick to the main louage st...Read More

The New Town

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
Tunis is a city of contrasts. Away from the medina are the modern streets of the New Town. It's here that you can see the French influence; the main Avenue Bourgiba looks like it's been lifted straight from the French Riviera with its Neoclassical architecture and little railed squares of green down the central reservation. There are beautiful baskets of flowers hanging from the buildings, and exotic palms give it a real feeling of Cannes. This is the less secular and more European side to the city. The only religious building in the area is the fantastic Catholic cathedral with its colourful mosaics, which has recently been restored to its former glory. The city's food market on Rue Allemagne i...Read More

My best meal...ever

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
Sadly we never found out the name (if it had one) of this little cafe tucked away in the depths of the medina. However, I shall never forget how much we enjoyed it and I would be depriving you if I did not tell you about it. The cafe has two floors and is tiny; at first it seemed to be full, but then we looked up and spotted a tiny upper floor with a couple of tables so we tentatively entered the cafe. We couldn't see the stairs at first but the "waiter" beckoned us on and then pointed the way. We sat down at the front of this upper area and from there we could look down to see the cooking area, the other diners and people wandering by through the medina. There was no menu save for a small black...Read More

Cafes or coffee shops?

Best Of IgoUgo

Story/Tip

Quote:
This entry is to serve as advice to any weary travellers looking for refreshment in Tunis. Cafes and coffee shops are very different. Cafes are essentially a male domain and in Tunis you can find cafes inside the medina and dotted around the New Town. These are easily the nearest thing you'll find to a British pub, although most we saw didn't sell alcohol. These places serve soft drinks and the ubiquitous highly sweetened (usually mint) tea. They are places for men to meet and discuss the days business. Some have TVs and often the men are watching football. The cafes are normally pretty open so you can look right in without much effort and decide whether you want to give it a go. Women are gene...Read More