Boston Journals

Historic Boston

An April 2003 trip to Boston by Mary Dickinson

Building Photo, Boston, Massachusetts More Photos
Quote: Showing pride in its prominent place in the history of the American Revolution, Boston is tourist friendly. A red brick line in the sidewalk guides the curious from one historic site to the next.

Historic Boston

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Overview

Freedom Trail Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
Stepping out of the subway onto the street, I looked around to find something historical and was shocked to find I had just stepped out of a door in the Old State House. The subway goes under it and many other historic buildings as well. But these historic places continue a sublime existence and ignore the subway's intrusion because they know they were here first and they are revered and protected. Millions of dollars keep the historic sites in prime condition, and it is money well spent because Boston is crowded with history lovers.Quick Tips: To get the most out of your touring time in Old Boston, stay on the Freedom Trail. A copy of The Complete Guide to Boston's Freedom Trail by C...Read More

Hilton Boston Logan Airport

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Hotel | "Hilton Boston at Logan Airport"

Quote:
My husband surprised me by treating us to an executive suite on the 10th floor of the Hilton Boston at Logan Airport. Our daughter had already booked a room for two nights at that hotel, and we drove up to Boston to visit with her. She would be busy during the day so we decided to tour historic Boston. The view from our room included most of Boston Harbor. The Hilton is expensive but nice. Our accommodations had a granite countertop sink in the bathroom. A computer was set up on the desk in the bedroom and the lovely coverlet on the bed had a down comforter inside. The refrigerator was completely stocked with goodies, but there is a charge for each item. We bring our own cooler with what we li...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 22, 2003

Hilton Boston Logan Airport
1 Hotel Drive
Boston, Massachusetts 02128
617-568-6700

Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

Restaurant | "Quincy Market"

Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
Vendors with free samples of food on toothpicks, crowds vieing for walking space, delicious food challenging us, and seemingly no place to sit and eat it - that's Quincy Market at lunch time. We reached the central dome and every seat was taken except for two in the balcony. Up the stairs and yes they were still available. City pidgeons got out of the way as I rushed to the coveted benches. My husband politely waited while I went back to the vendor with the free sample of chicken cooked in lemon and garlic sause, and I bought a roll-up. Then he found his favorite and as we ate our acquired treasures the pidgeons flew over our head, fanning us with their wings. To answer your question, there was no me...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 22, 2003

Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market
1 Faneuil Hall
Boston, Massachusetts 02109
(617) 227-0150

Durgin-Park

Restaurant | "Durgin-Park in Boston"

Quote:
It's in Dock Square and it's not a park, and there's no dock either. Tradition! At one time there was a dock here but the waterfront has been filled in. However, Durgin and Park were partners who started a restaurant in a warehouse near Fanueil Hall about 130 years ago. They want it to look like it did back then and it does. Once you've been seated at one of the long tables upstairs, you'll be okay with all that. The food is fresh, very fresh. You'll forget the old tin ceilings. Honest! Perfect cuts of prime rib just the way you like it. Excellent clam chowder and I'm fussy. A bowl full is an oversized meal. Fresh lobster daily. Steamers piled high on your plate. And you'll be okay with prices t...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 22, 2003

Durgin-Park
340 Faneuil Hall
Boston, Massachusetts 02109
+1 617 227 2038

Union Oyster House

Restaurant | "Ye Olde Union Oyster House"

Quote:
In its 250 year history this major historic landmark housed a dry goods store in 1742, was the site of a newspaper in 1771, a pay station for Federal troops during the Revolution, housed the future king of France, Louis Philippe, during his exile in 1796, and in 1826 became the Union Oyster House. It has been that ever since. Fresh meat and seafood properly prepared in a variety of tempting ways are old New England favorites. Appetizers include a delicious variety of clams and oysters served on the half shell or cooked in stews and chowders using old Yankee recipes that maintain good food should taste like what it is and be glad of it. Live lobsters from their own pools insure taste for th...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on April 22, 2003

Union Oyster House
41 Union St
Boston, Massachusetts 02108
+1 617 227 2750

Old State House

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Attraction | "The Old State House"

Old State House Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
Emerging from the MBTA subway (blue line), we exited onto State Street. To our surprise we were in front of the south wall and entrance to the Old State House. The subway goes under the building. Across the street is the National Park Service Visitors Center. They have a good assortment of books, information and gifts pertaining to Boston's history. Upstairs from it is the Boston Society Library a fantastic place to see original historical books and articles. Turning left from the subway exit we walked a few steps to the east side of the Old State House on Washington Street. The brick circle in the median in the road in front of the Old State House is the site ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on May 14, 2003

Old State House
206 Washington St
Boston, Massachusetts 02109
16177201713

Old South Meeting House

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Story/Tip

Old South Meeting House Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
Within sight of the Old State House is the Old South Meeting House. Skyscrapers dwarf its appearance as does its design (colonial church with steeple), but it is massive. It has the capacity to seat five thousand people. Prosperity in Boston is indicated by the need for a building with such proportions in 1730 along with the Old State House in 1713 and Faneuil Hall in 1740. Most of the people were decended from the early Pilgrims and Puritans. The ability to pay for a meeting house the size of Old South must have reminded the king his American subjects could afford to pay taxes. The people used the Old South Meeting House to give one voice in protest, a loud one. Filling Old South with that one...Read More
Quote:
Birth of independence from England is said to have started in diferent buildings nearby, here the death of those who started it is remembered. Three signers of the Declaration of Independence are buried here, as are the victims of the Boston Massacre, Ben Franklin's parents, and Paul Revere, who lived for another 43 years after his famous ride. James Otis and Samuel Adams, two very important Revolutionary War figures, are buried here. Peter Fanueil, responsible for building his famous market place and meeting hall, is buried here too.

Next to the burying ground is the Park Street Church, built in 1809 after the Massachusetts State House was erected on a hill nearby a few years earlier.

King's Chapel

Story/Tip

Schedule Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
Puritans settled in Massachusetts to avoid what they considered offensive about the Anglican Church, the official Church of England. In 1687 Gov. Andros, then governor of Massachusetts, seized a part of a burying ground in the king's name for the building of an Anglican Church. In 1749, as Boston prospered, the present King's Chapel was built over the first wooden one. Hostility towards King's Chapel ran high until after the Revolution. In 1785 the King's Chapel congregation became Unitarian and follows that theology today. Buildings in Boston such as the Old State House and Old South Meeting House are stately but austere. King's Chapel inside and out is ornate. Columns inside are fluted wtih han...Read More

King's Chapel Burying Ground

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Story/Tip

Building Photo, Boston, Massachusetts
Quote:
This is the oldest burying ground in Boston and the one that was disturbed by the building of King's Chapel. Like other Mayflower pilgrims, Mary Chilton and her husband John Winslow settled in Boston after 1630. Mary Chilton's will is a good source of the extent of the wealth of Boston residents of her class and era. They are buried in King's Chapel Burying Ground. Their tombstone has been replaced with a new one. William Dawes (who rode to Lexington to give the alarm when Paul Revere did) is also buried here. Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter character Hester Prynne, whose real name was Elizabeth Pain, is buried here. The carved Death's head and epitaphs on the tombstones are wo...Read More

Faneuil Hall

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Story/Tip

Quote:
Many years ago while I was in Boston I visited Faneuil Hall. Fish vendors occupied the street level. It was in the spirit of things as Peter Faneuil intended in 1742, but inappropriate for such a touristy area in modern times. Now crafts, souvenirs, T-shirts, and sweatshirts (mostly with Harvard or Boston) are sold instead of fish. Go to the outside entrance opposite Quincy Market and you can enter where 21 stairs lead to the meeting place on the second floor. Park rangers will give a talk about the hall. Famous paintings of Samuel Adams, George Washington, John Hancock, Peter Faneuil, and a huge canvas of Daniel Webster before the US Senate hang on the walls, reminding us of their part in our c...Read More