Cork Journals

Cork an Emerald Paradise

A travel journal to Cork by eros

Quote: Cork an Emerald Paradise, Situated On the River Lee this city boasts a friendly, warm and down to earth atmosphere. For Sightseeing and Shopping or for just somewhere to be yourself there is nowhere else better.

Cork an Emerald Paradise

Overview

Quote:
Cork is an Emerald Paradise. Situated On the River Lee this city boasts a friendly, warm, and down to earth atmosphere. For sightseeing and shopping, or for just somewhere to be yourself, there is nowhere else better.Quick Tips: If you come to Cork relax and enjoy it. It is a place where everything slows down, and time stands still beside you. It is a place where you can go to a traditional pub, relax, listen to music, or just wander down Patrick Street (Main Street) or pedestrian side street to watch the Busker (street musician) at the side of the street playing a tune to passerbys. Best Way To Get Around: The best way to get around cork is by car, with some of the best sightseein...Read More

Fota Wildlife Park

Attraction | "Fota Nature Reserve"

Quote:
Fota is a place where wildlife roam and people can get an up close view of them. Kids will love wandering around playing with monkeys and as a treat there is a fantastic fun fair at the end of the trail to take the kids to. Penguins live here, and in the river that goes around the whole park you might be lucky to bump into the seal who wanders round the park. He is very friendly and lazy. There are kangaroos relaxing in the shade, and they are also very friendly and can be fed sweets - they don't really like bread. In the ponds are ducks swimming around. Let the kids throw bread to them and watch the kids giggle as the ducks nibble at the bread. Cheetahs are a definite visit. The w...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 3, 2002

Fota Wildlife Park
Carrigtwohill
Cobh, Ireland
+353 21 481 2678

Shandon Tower

Attraction

Quote:
North of the River Lee is the area known as Shandon, a sadly neglected reminder of Cork's eighteenth-century status as the most important port in Europe for dairy products. To get there head up John Redmond Street, or simply aim for the giant fish atop the church tower.The most striking survival is the Cork Butter Exchange, stout nineteenth-century Classical buildings recently given over to rather quiet craft workshops. The old butter market itself sits like a generously proportioned butter tub in a cobbled square, and now houses the Firkin Crane Theatre.Despite the air of dereliction, this part of town is worth a visit for the pleasant Georgian church of St Anne's Shandon (1750), easily dis...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 4, 2002

Shandon Tower
Shandon Street
Cork, Ireland

Cork City Gaol

Attraction

Quote:
To the west of here is an area known as Sunday's Well, and Cork City Gaol (daily: March – October 9:30am – 6pm; November – February 10am – 5pm; £3.50/€4.44). It's a good thirty minutes walk from the city centre, up the hill from North Mall. A lively taped tour takes you through the prison, focusing on social history in a way that is both engaging and enlightening. It's occasionally threaded with characters of national importance, all vividly brought to life by a dramatic audiovisual finale.The gaol also houses the Radio Museum Experience (same times; £3.50/€4.44, combined ticket £6/€7.62), which uses similarly engaging techniques to convey the tremendous importance of the development of the wireles...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 4, 2002

Cork City Gaol
Convent Avenue
Cork, Ireland
+353 21 430 5022

St Finbarre's Cathedral

Attraction | "St Finbarrs Cathedral"

Quote:
The stark precision of nineteenth-century Gothic which is repeated time and again in the city's churches may not be to everyone's taste, but here it undeniably gives the city a rhythmic architectural cohesion. Both Pugin and Pain are very much in evidence, Pugin in the brilliant Revivalist essay of the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul on Friar Matthew Quay, with its handsome lantern spire, and Pain in St. Patrick's Church on Lower Glanmire Road. Best of all is William Burges' St. Finbarr's Cathedral (built 1867–79), obsessively detailed, with its impressive French Gothic spire providing a grand silhouette on the southwesternly shoulder of the city.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 4, 2002

St Finbarre's Cathedral
Bishop Street
Cork, Ireland
+353 21 496 3387

Blarney Castle/Blarney Stone

Attraction | "Blarney Castle – Home of the Blarney Stone"

Quote:
Blarney Castle is one of Ireland's oldest and most historic castles. It was built around 1446. An ancient stronghold of the MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry and one of the strongest fortresses in Munster, its walls are eighteen feet thick in places.

Located on the parapet of the castle is the famous "Blarney Stone". According to local legend, after kissing this stone, you will have the gift of eternal eloquence, or "the gift of the gab". To kiss the stone, you must first lie on your back, then leaning your head backwards and downwards, you kiss the underside of the stone. The last admission to the castle and grounds is 30 minutes before closing.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 4, 2002

Blarney Castle/Blarney Stone
Blarney Village Near the River Martin
Cork, Ireland
+353 21 438 5252

Quote:
Located in the town of Cobh. The story of Cobhs unique origins and its legacy are dramatically recalled at The Queenstown Story, a multi media exhibition at Cobhs restored Victorian Railway Station. Retrace the steps of the 2.5 million Irish people who emigrated from the port of Cobh, experience conditions aboard the emigrant vessels, and learn about the dramatic events surrounding the Lusitania and the Titanic - Cobh was its last port of call.

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on December 4, 2002

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh County, Cork