Mustang Journals

Bara Gaon: In The Midst Of Mustang

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An October 2002 trip to Mustang by Mutt

Muktinath Temple Complex Photo, Mustang, Nepal More Photos
Quote: Bara Gaon, the middle region of the Mustang district, is much visited thanks to it's location on the popular Jomson trek. It consists of 19 villages and is inhabited by the Bhotia people, who are Buddhists of Tibeto-Burman origin.

Bara Gaon: In The Midst Of Mustang

Overview

Muktinath Photo, Mustang, Nepal
Quote:
There are many fascinating sites to explore as you trek through this fascinating region high in the HimalayasThe ancient temple complex at Muktinath provides a unique insight into the beliefs of two of the world’s major religions, Hinduism and Buddhism and provides a lesson in cooperation that Jerusalem could learn from. The village of Kagbeni with its warren of streets, 16th-century fort, traditional family chapel, and curious village guards is undoubtedly worth a visit. As is the unspoiled village of Lupra where time has stood still and ancient gods still hold sway. Quick Tips: Unlike the highly restricted area of Upper Mustang, this area i...Read More

Muktinath Temple Complex

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Attraction

Muktinath Temple Complex Photo, Mustang, Nepal
Quote:
"A symbol of religious symbiosisbetween the Hindus and the Buddhists" The oft-quoted phrase above is indicative of this complex’s importance as a site that is sacred to both the regions main religions. Near the entrance to the complex is Gompa Samba (New Monastery) founded by Syandol as a hostel for Lamas it was later renovated by the local villagers. The Nyingmapa temple they constructed contains an interesting terracotta statue of Sakyamini (the historical Guatam Buddha) flanked by Chinserik (Avalokiteswara; the Buddhist god of protection) and Guru Rimpoche (Padmasambhava; the 8th-century Tantric saint and founder of the Nyingmapa sect who is c...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on November 15, 2002

Muktinath Temple Complex
Muktinath, Bara Gaon
Mustang, Nepal

Kagbeni Fortified Village

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Attraction | "Kagbeni Fortified Town"

Kagbeni Fortified Village Photo, Mustang, Nepal
Quote:
This curious medieval town, situated in a fertile valley amidst barren wastelands, is a maze of mud-brick houses and dark alleyways dominated by a massive and imposing red Gompa. The town's immense strategic importance, located as it is at the confluence of two river valleys, is demonstrated by the presence of the ruins of a 16th-century fort at the heart of the old town. Surrounding this is the tightly packed layout of streets around which a defensive wall with only two gates once stood. These medieval defences made the town so impregnable that it was deemed sufficient to have only two guards, one for each gate. In the 19th century, the human guards of these two gates were als...Read More

Member Rating 5 out of 5 on March 12, 2006

Kagbeni Fortified Village
Kagbeni, Bara Gaon
Mustang, Nepal

Lupra Bon-Po Village

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Attraction

Lupra Bon-Po Village Photo, Mustang, Nepal
Quote:
Far from the beaten track the isolated little village of Lupra has managed to maintain much of its unspoiled charm as well as some of its pre-Buddhist shamanistic beliefs. The village is approached from the riverbed where the foot of the steps is marked by a small wooden bridge and an attractively painted stupa. The village is a tight cluster of traditional Thakali homes without a teahouse or lodge in sight and rural village life goes-on here exactly as it has gone-on for centuries. When Padmasambhava converted Tibet to Buddhism in the 8th century, he is said to have subdued the old gods of the region allowing those that became Dharmapala (defenders of faith) to join the...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on March 12, 2006

Lupra Bon-Po Village
Lupra, Bara Gaon
Mustang, Nepal

Saliagrama

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Story/Tip

Gandaki River Photo, Mustang, Nepal
Quote:
While wandering along the valley you should keep an eye out for the curious black spiral stones known as Saliagrama that can occasional be found scattered amongst the far less interesting stones on the bed of Gandaki River.According to many Hindus, these curious stones are representative of Lord Vishnu in his first earthly incarnation. Vishnu came to Earth in the form of a fish known as Matsya, representing the formation of protoplasm and invertebrates. In this avatar he swam into the hands of king Manu, who was washing in the river, and warned him of the great flood that was coming to wipe out all life. Manu built a boat and took on board the "seeds of life" which Matsya the...Read More

Member Rating 2 out of 5 on March 12, 2006