St. Petersburg Journals

St Petersburg and the Gulf Beaches

A travel journal to St. Petersburg by Tolik

Clearwater Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida More Photos
Quote: Here I describe a slice of coastline along the Gulf of Mexico beginning in the Pinellas County and ending in the south at Fort Myeres.

St Petersburg and the Gulf Beaches

Overview

Clearwater Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida
Quote:
Our family visit St. Petersburg area often. The travel begins in the north with Tarpon Springs, continues southward with Clearwater and St. Petersburg covering an area known as the Suncoast. Then we move south to Bradenton and Sarasota, with their islands and the town of Venice. We finish our short trip at Bonito Beach. When visiting Florida you absolutely must visit St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Tarpon Springs, the Salvador Dali Museum, and of course, the Clearwater beach!Quick Tips: Since 1880s, when an exiled Russian nobleman Peter Demens gave the city railroad and the name of his Russian hometown, St. Petersburg has been associated with healthful climes and restorative wat...Read More

Tarpon Springs

Attraction

Tarpon Springs Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida
Quote:
Fred Howard Park hides far from the mainstream in Tarpon Springs, but is the best beach in this parts that is accessible from the mainland. The beautifully canopied grounds are favorite for picnickers. A mile long causeway delivers you from the mainland`s part of the Fred Howard Park to a sandy beach on the island (free parking). Greeks arrived in this lovely town about one hundred years ago to harvest Tarpon Springs’ fertile sponge crops, 30 feet below. Their influence remains strong in the town’s sponge market, Greek pastry shops, onion-domed Orthodox church, and annual Epiphany Day (Jan 6) dive for the cross. You will find Greek restaurants, an Athens street, a Poseidon gift St....Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Tarpon Springs
Tampa-St. Petersburg metro area Pinellas County
Tarpon Springs 34689

Clearwater Beach

Attraction

Quote:
The Clearwater area is the place to head if you are serious about spending days on and in the water. Its beach facilities are top-notch and its marinas are beehives of sail-away activity. Clearwater Beach has some of the widest, most gorgeous beaches in the area. Pier 60 Park, at the intersection of Causeway and Gulf-view boulevards, is most active, with its fishing pier, sheltered playground, and sand volleyball. Yes, lifeguards patrol the wide, sugar-sand beach. Across the south-end bridge to Sand Key lies Clearwater Beach’s famous recreational area, Sandy Key Park (picnic areas and playgrounds). A "key" is a small (generally under 10 acres), low-lying island. There are 882 keys in Florida. An...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Clearwater Beach
Gulf of Mexico, Pinellas County
Clearwater Beach, FL

The Dali Museum

Attraction | "Salvador Dali Museum"

The Dali Museum Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida
Quote:
One of the most impressive treasures, the Salvador Dali Museum houses the world ‘s largest collection of original works by the renowned surrealist.

The museum opened in 1982, 40 years after Ohio businessman Reynolds Morse first met the young artist and began collecting his works. In addition to 95 original oil paintings, the museum has more than 100 watercolors and drawings, along with 1,300 graphics.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

The Dali Museum
One Dali Boulevard
St. Petersburg 33701
(727) 823-3767

St. Pete Beach

Attraction

St. Pete Beach Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida
Quote:
St. Pete Beach (St. Petersburg was officially shortened to St. Pete because it was considered more evocative of fun filled resort) occupies 7.5-mile island known as Long Key. Its greatest landmark is the fantasy-pink Don CeSar Resort, playground of 1920s rich and famous such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Al Capone.

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

St. Pete Beach
155 Corey Avenue
St. Petersburg, Florida 33706
(727) 363-9243

Bradenton Beaches: Marina

Attraction | "Bradenton Beaches"

Bradenton Beaches: Marina Photo, St. Petersburg, Florida
Quote:
Bradenton trace its identity to Hernand de Soto, whom historians claim made his first New World landfall on local shores in 1539. As a result, Bradenton has a propensity for preserving history. To honor Bradenton’s trademark historical event, De Soto National Memorial Park recalls the life and times of explorer. Manatee Village Historical Park recounts the story of the Florida frontier a century ago. Two bridges link Bradenton to Anna Maria Island, whose sandy shoreline, backed by dunes, is largely undeveloped but it is washed by breakers big enough to attract surfers. The largest of the Bradenton-Sarasota islands, Anna Maria has three distinct communities. Northernmost Anna Maria has a casual ...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Bradenton Beaches: Marina
402 Church Ave
Bradenton Beach 34217
(941) 778-2288

Sarasota Beaches: Lido Beach Pool

Attraction | "Sarasota Beaches"

Quote:
Nicest and sportiest of the Gulf’s strip of beaches, South Lido Beach at Lido Key features a wide, sugar-sand white beach and picnic area. Unlike other West Coast beaches, Siesta Key gets quartz sand. Siesta Key’s claim to the world’s whitest beach has naturally made the island beach-preoccupied. Siesta Key County Beach is a half-mile long and luxuriously wide and its porcelain-white sands are plush. The north end of Casey Key provides a pleasant, winding drive around exclusive residential neighborhood. At its south end, bustling Nokomis Beach is resortier. North Jetty Park tips the island, where a small pass separeates it from Venice Beach. This is our favorite place in the island. Here...Read More

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Sarasota Beaches: Lido Beach Pool
400 Ben Franklin Dr
Sarasota 34236
(941) 861-1602

Venice

Attraction

Quote:
Venice has the same Mediterranean architecture, fun beaches, art galleries and seafood restaurants as Sarasota, but on smaller scale. Above all, Venice is recognized for its shark-teeth collecting. Snorkelers and beachcombers search for fossil specimens that wash up from an ancient shark graveyard offshore.

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Bonita Springs

Attraction

Quote:
Bonita Springs calls itself “Gateway to the Gulf” because its exit off I-75 (no. 18) comes closer to the beach than the other exits. At Bonita Public Beach visitors will find sheltered picnic tables, lifeguards, and a food stand. North of the main beach, along Hickory Blvd., numerous access points offer limited facilities and free parking (3 – 4 cars at a lot).

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Bonita Springs
located between Ft Myers and Naples
St. Petersburg, Florida

Southwest Florida Museum of History

Attraction | "Fort Myers"

Quote:
“There is only one Fort Myers and 90 million people will find it out”, declared Thomas Edison (1847 – 1931) in the late 1880s. The inventor moved his winter quarters to town after northern chills threatened his health. He built the estate in 1886, and the house, laboratory, and botanical garden are much as he left them. The area’s balmy weather would extend his life another 46 years. Edison was also an enthusiastic horticulturist, and the gardens around the house and laboratory contain a great variety of exotic plants. The giant banyan tree, which was given by the tire magnate Firestone in 1925, boasts a circumference in excess of 400ft (120m).

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on July 20, 2002

Southwest Florida Museum of History
2300 Peck St.
Fort Myers 33901
(239) 332-5955

Quote:
Juan Ponce de Leon was the first European to set foot upon these shores, somewhere in Charlotte harbor in 1513. In 1539, while searching for gold, Hernando de Soto sailed into Tampa Bay. The Indian tribes living there called their village `Tanpa`, which means `sticks of fire`. Early explorers misspelled the name when they drew up maps, and the area became known as Tampa. The first white men traveled to western Florida for adventure. And they found it aplenty: half-naked natives, tricky waterways, impenetrable swamp, and fire-brewed stews. In search for gold and youth, they chose to kill some natives and curse the rest. They brought their own hogs, cows, and citrus to eat, then eventually left, di...Read More