Philadelphia Journals

Philly

A May 2002 trip to Philadelphia by soothsayer

Liberty Bell Photo, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania More Photos
Quote: Just visiting.

Philly

Overview

Quote:
Philadelphia is an old city, and the birthplace of our nation since the signing of the Declaration of Independence. There is a lot to do in town, and a lot to eat.

Quick Tips:

Best Way To Get Around:

Public transportation, by train or by bus, to Philadelphia, is pretty good. Public transportation within the city, however, is another matter, and is often slow; on the weekends, it is excruciating.

Monk's Cafe

Restaurant

Monk's Cafe Photo, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Quote:
Located near Rittenhouse Square in Downtown Philadelphia, Monk`s Cafe is a warm, intimate bistro whose primary mission is to serve the best beers and ales available. Their menu is a who`s who list of Belgian BOI (beers of importance), which includes many draft items rarely found in other places. Monk`s cafe also serves good hearty food that not only satisfies the soul, but complements the beer. Menu items include a large pot of mussels steamed in beer, pomme frites, and the charcuterie platter.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 14, 2002

Monk's Cafe
264 South 16th St
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102
+ 1 215 545 7005

Geno's Steaks

Restaurant

Quote:
Philly cheese steaks; a Philadelphia specialty, and no one does them better than Geno's. These sandwiches, if you can call them that, are made with steak sliced thin (steak-ums), and topped with onions, cheese-whiz, or provolone cheese. Although Philly cheese steaks are full of grease (and no self-respecting New Yorker would touch one :-)), they are satisfying after walking around all day, not to mention easy on the wallet.

Should Geno's not satisfy, you can try its mortal competitor, Pat's, located across the street.

Member Rating 3 out of 5 on June 14, 2002

Geno's Steaks
1219 South 9th Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19147
(215) 389-0659

Independence Hall

Attraction

Quote:
Independence Hall is the soul of our nation. The Declaration of Independence was signed inside the meeting hall upstairs, and celebrations were held in the ballroom next door. A trip to Philadelphia for first time visitors is not complete without visiting this historic site. The red brick building is the centerpiece of Independence National Historic Park, located in Walnut Street in the heart of Philadelphia. The US Park Rangers will require you to take the tour and the 10 minute orientation; you cannot just wander off into the building.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 14, 2002

Independence Hall
500 Chestnut St
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
215/597-8974

Liberty Bell

Attraction

Liberty Bell Photo, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Quote:
The Liberty Bell was originally cast in England to commemorate William Penn's charter of Privileges in 1701. In 1776, the bell was rung to summon citizens to hear the Declaration of Independence. The cracks in the bell were thought to have stemmed from casting mistakes, and the bell was last rung on Washington's birthday in 1846. The bell sits today in an air-conditioned pavillion.

Member Rating 4 out of 5 on June 14, 2002

Liberty Bell
500 Market St (corner Fifth And Sixth Streets)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Quote:
Among the many options of reaching Philadelphia is the train. The city is located along the Northeast Corridor, the railine that stretches from Washington DC, all the way up to Maine. Many regional rail lines service the NE Corridor: among them, NJ Transit, and SEPTA.

To get to Philadelphia from NYC, you can simply hop on a NJ Transit train bound for Trenton. At Trenton, a SEPTA train (number R7) will be waiting on the same platform. Simply buy a one way ticket, $5.50, and hop on. The SEPTA-NJTransit option is cheaper than Amtrack.